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THE EFFECTS OF RACIAL/ETHNIC SEGREGATION ON LATINO AND BLACK HOMICIDE

Authors


  • Special thanks to Umash Prasad and David J. van Alstyne for their assistance in compiling, accessing, and addressing questions about the CA-NY data. Thanks also to Dr. Stephanie Bohon and to the anonymous reviewers for their constructive suggestions and their help in revising this article.

Ben Feldmeyer, Department of Sociology, University of Tennessee, 901 McClung Tower, Knoxville, TN 37996; e-mail: bfeldmey@utk.edu

Abstract

Racial/ethnic residential segregation has been shown to contribute to violence and have harmful consequences for minority groups. However, research examining the segregation–crime relationship has focused almost exclusively on blacks and whites while largely ignoring Latinos and other race/ethnic groups and has rarely considered potential mediators (e.g., concentrated disadvantage) in segregation–violence relationships. This study uses year 2000 arrest data for California and New York census places to extend segregation–crime research by comparing the effects of racial/ethnic residential segregation from whites on black and Latino homicide. Results indicate that (1) racial/ethnic segregation contributes to both Latino and black homicide, and (2) the effects for both groups are mediated by concentrated disadvantage. Implications for segregation–violence relationships, the racial-invariance position, and the Latino paradox are discussed.

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