Erratum

Errata

This article corrects:

  1. DO RACIAL AND ETHNIC STEREOTYPES DEPEND ON THE SEX OF TARGET GROUP MEMBERS? Evidence from a Survey-Based Experiment Volume 48, Issue 3, 399–433, Article first published online: June 2007

In [1], the following error was published on page 411.

For the sociability stereotype (Figure 2), White respondents on average rate Asian and Hispanic women significantly more congenial than the men of those target groups, and Black respondents rate Hispanic women more sociable. Thus, there is only weak support for our hypothesis that women would be perceived to be more sociable than men; women are rated more sociable on 9 of the 12 possible differences, yet only three are statistically significant. Similarly, on the fairness stereotype (Figure 3), Blacks and Whites rate Asian women less likely to discriminate than Asian men; Blacks also rate White women as less likely to discriminate than their male counterparts. On this stereotype, 8 of the 12 possible sex differences show women rated as more fair than men, yet only three achieve statistical significance at the .05 level.

The text was incorrect and should have read:

For the sociability stereotype (Figure 2), Blacks and Whites rate Asian women more sociable than Asian men; Blacks also rate White women as more sociable than their male counterparts. On this stereotype, 8 of the 12 possible sex differences show women rated as more sociable than men, yet only three achieve statistical significance at the .05 level. Similarly, on the fairness stereotype (Figure 3), White respondents on average rate Asian and Black women significantly less likely to discriminate than the men of those target groups, and Black respondents rate Hispanic women fairer. Thus, there is only weak support for our hypothesis that women would be perceived to be less discriminatory than men; women are rated fairer on 9 of the 12 possible differences, yet only three are statistically significant.

We apologize for this error.

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