Social Psychology of Blood Donors

Authors

  • S. Condie,

    1. Central Blood Bank of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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      S. Condie, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84601.

  • N. Maxwell

    1. Central Blood Bank of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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      N. Maxwell, M.D., Medical Director, Central Blood Bank of Pittsburgh, Clinical Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University Health Center of Pittsburgh, 812 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219.


Abstract

In this study responses of first-time donors were compared to those of repeating donors. Veteran donors were much less reluctant toward giving blood and anticipated much less difficulty. Veteran donors are much more susceptible to blood bank solicitations. Neophyte donors were influenced by friends to give blood to a greater degree. It would appear from the data that to recruit a donor the first time the most effective means would be a personal request or urging by friends. After he has given once, however, the donor is induced effectively to continue giving by less personal appeals. Veteran donors possess more accurate knowledge about blood banking and the transfusion process. Neophyte donors are bothered more significantly by the pain involved in giving blood. The veteran group contained a significantly larger proportion of men. The neophytes were more likely to be younger, unmarried, part-time or not employed, and engaged in blue-collar occupations.

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