SEN virus: epidemiology and characteristics of a transfusion-transmitted virus

Authors

  • Jun Akiba,

    1. From the Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesdal, Maryland; the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and the Department of Pathology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan.
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  • Takeji Umemura,

    1. From the Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesdal, Maryland; the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and the Department of Pathology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan.
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  • Harvey J. Alter,

    1. From the Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesdal, Maryland; the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and the Department of Pathology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan.
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  • Masamichi Kojiro,

    1. From the Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesdal, Maryland; the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and the Department of Pathology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan.
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  • Edward Tabor

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesdal, Maryland; the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and the Department of Pathology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan.
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Edward Tabor, MD, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, HFM-300, 1401 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852-1448; e-mail: tabor@cber.fda.gov.

Abstract

SEN virus (SEN-V) is a blood-borne, single-stranded, nonenveloped DNA virus. Although its prevalence varies by geographic region, it has been detected in as many as 30 percent of postoperative transfusion recipients, compared to 3 percent of postoperative patients who did not receive transfusions. A significant association has been observed between transfusion volume and the occurrence of SEN-V infection. Transmission by transfusion also has been confirmed by the detection of greater than 99 percent homology between SEN-V in donor and recipient sera. Concurrent infections with SEN-V and hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 have been documented, and these observations probably reflect the blood-borne transmission of these viruses as well as SEN-V. Although SEN-V was discovered as part of a search for causes of posttransfusion hepatitis, there is no firm evidence so far that SEN-V infection either causes hepatitis or worsens the course of coexistent liver disease. Nevertheless, SEN-V appears to be transmitted by transfusion, and further studies may reveal more about its role in the future.

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