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Universal adoption of pathogen inactivation of platelet components: impact on platelet and red blood cell component use

Authors

  • Jean Claude Osselaer,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Chantal Doyen,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Laurence Defoin,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Cecile Debry,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Maité Goffaux,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Nathalie Messe,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Maryse Van Hooydonk,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Andre Bosly,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Jin Sying Lin,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Lily Lin,

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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  • Laurence Corash

    1. From the Transfusion Center and the Hematology Service, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, Yvoir, Belgium; and Cerus Corporation, Concord, California.
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Laurence Corash, MD, Cerus Corporation, 2411 Stanwell Drive, Concord, CA 94520; e-mail: lcorash@cerus.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pathogen inactivation of platelet (PLT) components (INTERCEPT Blood System, Cerus Europe) was implemented into routine practice at a blood center supporting a tertiary care hospital. Utilization of platelet components (PCs) and red blood cell (RBC) components was analyzed for 3 years before and 3 years after introduction of pathogen inactivation to assess the impact of pathogen inactivation on component use.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. An electronic database used in routine blood bank hemovigilance to monitor production and use of blood components was analyzed to assess clinical outcomes.

RESULTS: Transfusion records were analyzed for 688 patients supported with conventional PCs and 795 patients supported with pathogen inactivation PCs. Additional analyses were conducted for intensively transfused hematology patients. Patient demographics (age category, sex, and diagnostic category) were not different in the two observation periods. For all patients, mean numbers of PC per patient were not different for conventional PCs and pathogen inactivation PCs (9.9 ± 19.5 vs. 10.1 ± 20.9, p = 0.88). Data for hematology patients (272 conventional PCs and 276 pathogen inactivation PCs) confirmed that days of PLT support were not different (31.6 ± 42.6 vs. 33.1 ± 47.9, p = 0.70) nor was total PLT dose (1011) per patient (87.3 ± 115.4 vs. 88.1 ± 111.6, p = 0.93). RBC use, for all patients and hematology patients, was not different in the two observation periods, either during periods of PLT support or outside periods of PLT transfusion support.

CONCLUSION: Pathogen inactivation of PCs had no adverse impact on component use during a 3-year observation period of routine practice.

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