Validation of short-term handling and storage conditions for marrow and peripheral blood stem cell products

Authors

  • Grace S. Kao,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Haesook T. Kim,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Heather Daley,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Jerome Ritz,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Scott R. Burger,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Linda Kelley,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Cynthia Vierra-Green,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Sue Flesch,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Stephen Spellman,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • John Miller,

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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  • Dennis Confer

    1. From the Department of Medical Oncology and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Advanced Cell & Gene Therapy, LLC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; and the National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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Grace S. Kao, MD, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115; e-mail: grace_kao@dfci.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants from unrelated donors are routinely used in the treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies. These cellular products are often collected off-site and require transport from the collection site to transplantation centers. However, the effects of transport conditions and media on stem cell graft composition during short-term storage have not been well described.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Five bone marrow (BM), four filgrastim-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC), and four nonmobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMNC) products were collected from healthy volunteer donors and stored at 4 or 20°C for up to 72 hours in 10% PlasmaLyte A plus anticoagulants such as 10% acid citrate dextran-A (ACD-A) and/or 10 IU/mL heparin. Products were evaluated at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours for cellular content, viability, and metabolic activities.

RESULTS: BM products maintained equivalent cell viability when stored at either 4 or 20°C over 72 hours, but cell viability was better maintained for PBSC products stored at 4°C. The mean viable CD34+ cell recovery for PBSC and BM products stored over 72 hours at 4°C was higher than 75%. Significantly lower CD34+ cell and colony-forming unit recoveries were seen in PBSC products but not BM products stored at room temperature. Faster lactic acid accumulation was observed in PBMNC and PBSC products stored without ACD-A.

CONCLUSIONS: Seventy-two-hour storage of BM, PBSC, and PBMNC products at refrigerated temperature maintains optimal cell viability and recovery. Anticoagulation with ACD-A is preferred over heparin to reduce lactic acid accumulation in the product media.

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