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Cellular therapies supplement: strategies for improving transplant efficiency in the context of cellular therapeutics

Authors

  • Antonio Jimenez,

    1. From the Section of Hematology & Section of Bone Marrow Transplant and Cell Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Cell Therapy, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
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  • Henry C. Fung,

    1. From the Section of Hematology & Section of Bone Marrow Transplant and Cell Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Cell Therapy, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
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  • Kent W. Christopherson 2nd

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Section of Hematology & Section of Bone Marrow Transplant and Cell Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Cell Therapy, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
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  • This work was supported primarily through a research grant from the NBF (031824) to KWC. Some of the work was also supported though the Coleman Chair to HCF by the Coleman Foundation. KWC was also supported during this research period by grants from the American Association for Cancer Research (07-10 19-CHRI), the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (6044-08), the NIH—National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases award (DK074892), the Rubschlager Foundation, and the Coleman Foundation (56442).

Kent Christopherson II, PhD, Section of Hematology and Section of Bone Marrow Transplant and Cell Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Cell Therapy, Rush University Medical Center, 1725 W. Harrison St., Suite 834, Chicago, IL 60612; e-mail: Kent_Christopherson@rush.edu.

Abstract

The field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has overcome many obstacles that have led to our current clinical ability to utilize cells collected from marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood for the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant hematologic diseases. It is in this context that it becomes evident that future progress will lie in our development of an understanding of the biology by which the process of HSCT is regulated. By understanding the cellular components and the mechanisms by which HSCT is either enhanced or suppressed it will then be possible to design therapeutic strategies to improve rates of engraftment that will have a positive impact on immune reconstitution post-HSCT. In this review we focus primarily on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), the current challenges associated with allo-HSCT, and some developing strategies to improve engraftment in this setting.

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