A Web-based approach to blood donor preparation

Authors


Christopher R. France, PhD, Department of Psychology, 251 Porter Hall, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701; e-mail: France@ohio.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Written and video approaches to donor education have been shown to enhance donation attitudes and intentions to give blood, particularly when the information provides specific coping suggestions for donation-related concerns. This study extends this work by comparing Web-based approaches to donor preparation among donors and nondonors.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Young adults (62% female; mean [±SD] age, 19.3 [±1.5] years; mean [range] number of prior blood donations, 1.1 [0-26]; 60% nondonors) were randomly assigned to view 1) a study Web site designed to address common blood donor concerns and suggest specific coping strategies (n = 238), 2) a standard blood center Web site (n = 233), or 3) a control Web site where participants viewed videos of their choice (n = 202). Measures of donation attitude, anxiety, confidence, intention, anticipated regret, and moral norm were completed before and after the intervention.

RESULTS: Among nondonors, the study Web site produced greater changes in donation attitude, confidence, intention, and anticipated regret relative to both the standard and the control Web sites, but only differed significantly from the control Web site for moral norm and anxiety. Among donors, the study Web site produced greater changes in donation confidence and anticipated regret relative to both the standard and the control Web sites, but only differed significantly from the control Web site for donation attitude, anxiety, intention, and moral norm.

CONCLUSION: Web-based donor preparation materials may provide a cost-effective way to enhance donation intentions and encourage donation behavior.

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