Pathogen inactivation of platelets using ultraviolet C light: effect on in vitro function and recovery and survival of platelets

Authors

  • Saber Bashir,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Philip Cookson,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Michael Wiltshire,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Louise Hawkins,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Luke Sonoda,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Stephen Thomas,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Axel Seltsam,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Frank Tolksdorf,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Lorna M. Williamson,

    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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  • Rebecca Cardigan

    Corresponding author
    1. From the NHS Blood & Transplant, Brentwood, UK; NHS Blood & Transplant, Cambridge, UK; the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge UK; the German Red Cross Blood Service NSTOB, Springe, Germany; and MacoPharma International GmbH, Langen, Germany.
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Rebecca Cardigan, NHS Blood & Transplant, Long Road, Cambridge, CB2 2PT, UK; e-mail: rebecca.cardigan@nhsbt.nhs.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We evaluated the effect of treating platelets (PLTs) using ultraviolet (UV)C light without the addition of any photosensitizing chemicals on PLT function in vitro and PLT recovery and survival in an autologous radiolabeled volunteer study.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: For in vitro studies, pooled or single buffy coat–derived PLT concentrates (PCs) were pooled and split to obtain identical PCs that were either treated with UVC or untreated (n = 6 each) and stored for 7 days. PLT recovery and survival were determined in a two-arm parallel autologous study in healthy volunteers performed according to BEST guidelines. UVC-treated or untreated PCs (n = 6 each) were stored for 5 days and were compared to fresh PLTs from the same donor.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences on Day 7 of storage between paired UVC-treated and control PC units for pH, adenosine triphosphate, lactate dehydrogenase, CD62P, CD63, PLT microparticles, and JC-1 binding, but annexin V binding, lactate accumulation, and expression of CD41/61 were significantly higher in treated units (p < 0.05). Compared with control units, the recovery and survival of UVC-treated PC were reduced after 5 days of storage (p < 0.05) and when expressed as a percentage of fresh values, survival was reduced by 20% (p = 0.005) and recovery by 17% (p = 0.088).

CONCLUSION: UVC-treated PLTs stored for 5 days showed marginal changes in PLT metabolism and activation in vitro and were associated with a degree of reduction in recovery and survival similar to other pathogen inactivation systems that are licensed and in use.

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