Incidence and mortality of venous thrombosis: a population-based study

Authors

  • I. A. NÆSS,

    1. Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway; and Department of Haematology, St Olavs Hospital HF, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
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  • S. C. CHRISTIANSEN,

    1. Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands
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  • P. ROMUNDSTAD,

    1. Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway
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  • S. C. CANNEGIETER,

    1. Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands
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  • F. R. ROSENDAAL,

    1. Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands
    2. Department of Haematology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands
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  • J. HAMMERSTRØM

    1. Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway; and Department of Haematology, St Olavs Hospital HF, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
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Inger A. Næss, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7489 Trondheim, Norway.
Tel.: +47 7407 5180; fax: +47 7407 5181; e-mail: inger.anne.ness@ntnu.no

Summary.

Background:  Estimates of the incidence of venous thrombosis (VT) vary, and data on mortality are limited.

Objectives:  We estimated the incidence and mortality of a first VT event in a general population.

Methods:  From the residents of Nord-Trøndelag county in Norway aged 20 years and older (n = 94 194), we identified all cases with an objectively verified diagnosis of VT that occurred between 1995 and 2001. Patients and diagnosis characteristics were retrieved from medical records.

Results:  Seven hundred and forty patients were identified with a first diagnosis of VT during 516 405 person-years of follow-up. The incidence rate for all first VT events was 1.43 per 1000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33–1.54], that for deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) was 0.93 per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 0.85–1.02), and that for pulmonary embolism (PE) was 0.50 per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 0.44–0.56). The incidence rates increased exponentially with age, and were slightly higher in women than in men. The 30-day case-fatality rate was higher in patients with PE than in those with DVT [9.7% vs. 4.6%, risk ratio 2.1 (95% CI: 1.2–3.7)]; it was also higher in patients with cancer than in patients without cancer [19.1% vs. 3.6%, risk ratio 3.8 (95% CI 1.6–9.2)]. The risk of dying was highest in the first months subsequent to the VT, after which it gradually approached the mortality rate in the general population.

Conclusions:  This study provides estimates of incidence and mortality of a first VT event in the general population.

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