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Predictors of Parental Risk Perceptions: The Case of Child Pedestrian Injuries in School Context

Authors

  • Marie-Soleil Cloutier,

    Corresponding author
      Address correspondence to Marie-Soleil Cloutier, Centre Urbanisation, Culture et Société, INRS, 385 Sherbrooke St. E., Montreal, Canada H2X 1E3; tel: 514-499-4096; fax: 514-499-4065; marie-soleil.cloutier@ucs.inrs.ca.
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    • Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Urbanisation, Culture et Société (INRS-UCS).

    • Spatial Analysis and Regional Economics Laboratory (SAREL).

  • Jacques Bergeron,

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    • Psychology Department, Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

  • Philippe Apparicio

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    • Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Urbanisation, Culture et Société (INRS-UCS).

    • Spatial Analysis and Regional Economics Laboratory (SAREL).


Address correspondence to Marie-Soleil Cloutier, Centre Urbanisation, Culture et Société, INRS, 385 Sherbrooke St. E., Montreal, Canada H2X 1E3; tel: 514-499-4096; fax: 514-499-4065; marie-soleil.cloutier@ucs.inrs.ca.

Abstract

The objective of this article is to explore the factors that influence parental risk perceptions of child pedestrian injuries in the elementary school context. Parents (n= 193) from six different schools responded to a questionnaire on road safety, including a measure of their risk perception. Results of bivariate analyses show that eight variables are significantly related to risk perception. Environmental variables, as we measure them, were not significant, contrary to our initial hypotheses. Only three variables, parent's gender, perceived primary source of danger, and sense of control remained significant in OLS regression analyses (adjusted R2 of 0.16, F= 9.27; p= 0.00). Since parents’ perceptions of road risks are an important factor in their road safety practices and in their choice of transportation mode used for their child's journey to school, our analysis elucidates factors underlying these choices. Our results can help decisionmakers to design traffic injury prevention measures and to promote physical activity through the use of active modes of transport.

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