Framework for Microbial Food-Safety Risk Assessments Amenable to Bayesian Modeling

Authors


Address correspondence to Michael S. Williams, Risk Assessment Division, Office of Public Health Science, Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA, 2150 Centre Avenue, Building D, Fort Collins, CO 80526; tel: 970-492-7189; Mike.williams@fsis.usda.gov.

Abstract

Regulatory agencies often perform microbial risk assessments to evaluate the change in the number of human illnesses as the result of a new policy that reduces the level of contamination in the food supply. These agencies generally have regulatory authority over the production and retail sectors of the farm-to-table continuum. Any predicted change in contamination that results from new policy that regulates production practices occurs many steps prior to consumption of the product. This study proposes a framework for conducting microbial food-safety risk assessments; this framework can be used to quantitatively assess the annual effects of national regulatory policies. Advantages of the framework are that estimates of human illnesses are consistent with national disease surveillance data (which are usually summarized on an annual basis) and some of the modeling steps that occur between production and consumption can be collapsed or eliminated. The framework leads to probabilistic models that include uncertainty and variability in critical input parameters; these models can be solved using a number of different Bayesian methods. The Bayesian synthesis method performs well for this application and generates posterior distributions of parameters that are relevant to assessing the effect of implementing a new policy. An example, based on Campylobacter and chicken, estimates the annual number of illnesses avoided by a hypothetical policy; this output could be used to assess the economic benefits of a new policy. Empirical validation of the policy effect is also examined by estimating the annual change in the numbers of illnesses observed via disease surveillance systems.

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