Stereotype-Based Expectancies: Effects on Information Processing and Social Behavior

Authors

  • David L. Hamilton,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of California, Santa Barbara
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      DAVID L. HAMILTON is Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research investigates the role of cognitive mechanisms in social perception, particularly stereotyping, impression formation, and attribution processes.

  • Steven J. Sherman,

    1. Indiana University
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      STEVEN J. SHERMAN is Professor of Psychology at Indiana University. His research investigates a variety of topics, including judgment and decision making, attitude formation and change, stereotyping, priming, social explanation, and adolescent substance use.

  • Catherine M. Ruvolo

    1. University of California, Santa Barbara
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      CATHERINE M. RUVOLO is a graduate student in social psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A graduate of Dartmouth College, she is conducting research on self-fulfilling prophecies, cognitive biases in stereotyping, and determinants of feelings of interpersonal closeness.


Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106

Abstract

Expectancies about others are often based on stereotypes of the groups to which they belong. This article reviews the effects of stereotype-based expectancies on social perception and behavior. An information processing perspective is adopted in discussing the research evidence concerning the effects of stereotypes on (a) information processing and judgments, (b) information seeking and hypothesis testing, and (c) interpersonal behavior via self-fulfilling prophecies. Possible strategies for undermining these effects are also discussed.

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