How Ideological Attitudes Predict Host Society Members’ Attitudes toward Immigrants: Exploring Cross-National Differences

Authors

  • J. Christopher Cohrs,

    Corresponding author
    1. Queen's University Belfast
      Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Christopher Cohrs, Queen's University Belfast, School of Psychology, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland [e-mail: c.cohrs@qub.ac.uk].
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  • Monika Stelzl

    1. St. Thomas University
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  • Many thanks to those who provided us with results from unpublished data or further information on published studies: Nazar Akrami, Antonio Bustillos, Antonio Chirumbolo, Gernot von Collani, Ilse Cornelis, Michael Dambrun, John Duckitt, Bart Duriez, Vicki Esses, Wolfgang Frindte, Roberto González, Andrès Haye, Kirsten Heitland, Gordon Hodson, Matthew Hornsey, Philipp Jugert, Richard Lalonde, Karmela Liebkind, Winnifred Louis, Joke Meeus, Chan-Hoong Leong, Jos Meloen, Sam Pehrson, Kristina Pentti, Thomas Petzel, Joshua Rabinowitz, Kate Reynolds, Miriam Rieck, Arne Roets, Chris Sibley, Alexandra Snellman, Leanne Son Hing, Jost Stellmacher, Chiara Storari, Lotte Thomsen, Elena Trifiletti, Ayse Üskül, Alain Van Hiel, Uwe Wolfradt, Silke Zachariae, and Ingrid Zakrisson.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Christopher Cohrs, Queen's University Belfast, School of Psychology, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland [e-mail: c.cohrs@qub.ac.uk].

Abstract

Recent theoretical frameworks assume that the ideological attitudes of right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) and social dominance orientation (SDO) predict individuals’ attitudes toward immigrant groups, and that these predictive relations are affected by contextual factors. Based on these assumptions, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relations between ideological attitudes and anti-immigrant attitudes in 155 samples from 17 countries (totalN= 38,522 participants). As potential correlates of cross-national differences in these relations, socioeconomic indices, cultural worldviews, and collective perceptions of immigrants were considered. RWA was a particularly strong predictor of anti-immigrant attitudes in countries where immigrants were perceived as increasing the crime rate and as not being beneficial to the economy (e.g., Germany, Italy); and SDO was a particularly strong predictor in countries with a higher relative unemployment rate of immigrants (e.g., Belgium, Sweden). We discuss the interplay of individual and sociocultural factors and offer directions for future research.

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