Psychologists, Race, and Housing in Postwar America

Authors

  • Wade E. Pickren

    Corresponding author
    1. Ryerson University
      Correspondence concerning the article should be addressed to Wade E. Pickren, Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria St., Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada [e-mail: wpickren@psych.ryerson.ca].
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Correspondence concerning the article should be addressed to Wade E. Pickren, Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria St., Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada [e-mail: wpickren@psych.ryerson.ca].

Abstract

Housing in postwar America became a critical focal point for issues of race and social equality. Housing and race relations became a real-world laboratory for psychologists and other social scientists, including several of the leaders ofSociety for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, to examine developing theories of intergroup relations, especially as potential means to reduce prejudice. Further, it is argued that psychologists sought to impact emerging housing policy and to ameliorate an enduring social problem. The author concludes that the efforts by social scientists to provide workable solutions, typically from an unacknowledged place of White privilege, proved largely ineffective.

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