Is Japan Closer to the West Than Turkey?

Authors

  • KENZABURO OE,

    1. Japan's KENZABURO OE and Turkey's ORHAN PAMUK—two novelists who have won the Nobel Prize in Literature—sat down in late May for a dialogue at a special literature workshop in Nagoya, Japan, to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the annual forum “Creativity in the 21st Century with Nobel Laureates,” co-organized by NPQ's associate paper in Japan, the Yomiuri Shimbun and NHK. They also responded to questions from the audience.
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  • ORHAN PAMUK

    1. Japan's KENZABURO OE and Turkey's ORHAN PAMUK—two novelists who have won the Nobel Prize in Literature—sat down in late May for a dialogue at a special literature workshop in Nagoya, Japan, to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the annual forum “Creativity in the 21st Century with Nobel Laureates,” co-organized by NPQ's associate paper in Japan, the Yomiuri Shimbun and NHK. They also responded to questions from the audience.
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  • Aside from their status as Nobel laureates, Oe and Pamuk have faced similar battles with their nationalist compatriots. Oe was recently victorious in a long court battle with Japanese rightists for implicating the Japanese military in the mass suicides of civilians during the battle of Okinawa in his book Okinawa Notes. In 2005, charges were brought against Pamuk for “insulting Turkishness” after his statement regarding the mass killings of Armenians during and after World War I; the charges were dropped in 2006.

Abstract

American-led globalization has enabled the third great powershift of the last five hundred years—the “rise of the rest” following on the rise of the West and then the rise of the US as the dominant power in the West.

When China, India, Brazil, Turkey and the rest sit at the table of global power with the West what will the world order look like? Will it be post-American? Will it be culturally non-Western, but play by the same rules of an open international order laid down by the American's after World War II?

In the following pages, leading American and Asian intellectuals ponder these questions.

Ancillary