Legislative Influences on Performance Management Reform

Authors

  • Carolyn Bourdeaux,

    Corresponding author
    1. Georgia State University
      Carolyn Bourdeaux is an assistant professor in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. Her research focuses on the implications of legislative integration of performance information into budget processes. Previous publications include a review of efforts to implement performance-based management at the local level in Public Administration Review and an evaluation of the use of alternative dispute resolution at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Negotiation Journal.
      E-mail: cbourdeaux@gsu.edu
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  • Grace Chikoto

    Corresponding author
    1. Georgia State University
      Grace Chikoto is a research associate working on her doctoral degree in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. Her research interests include program evaluation and performance management.
      E-mail: gchikoto@gsu.edu
    Search for more papers by this author

Carolyn Bourdeaux is an assistant professor in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. Her research focuses on the implications of legislative integration of performance information into budget processes. Previous publications include a review of efforts to implement performance-based management at the local level in Public Administration Review and an evaluation of the use of alternative dispute resolution at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Negotiation Journal.
E-mail: cbourdeaux@gsu.edu

Grace Chikoto is a research associate working on her doctoral degree in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. Her research interests include program evaluation and performance management.
E-mail: gchikoto@gsu.edu

Abstract

The management literature argues that legislative involvement is important to the implementation of performance management reform, but it does not specify how legislatures should be engaged or how different legislative organizational arrangements affect reform. This article blends theories of management and legislative professionalism to better understand the influence of legislatures on the implementation of management reform. Drawing on data from several surveys, it examines the influence of legislative organization on the managerial use of performance measures. The findings suggest that citizen legislatures are associated with better administrative practices than professional legislatures and that the quality of legislative involvement may be more important than its quantity.

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