The “Efficient” Public Administrator: Pareto and a Well-Rounded Approach to Public Administration

Authors

  • Christopher Grandy

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Hawaii
      Christopher Grandy is an associate professor of public administration at the University of Hawaii (Manoa). After completing a doctorate in economics at the University of California, Berkeley, he taught in the economics departments of Barnard College and the University of Hawaii before working for six years as an economist for the Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. He specializes in public policy and public finance issues, particularly taxation and public budgeting. He was a member of the 2005–2007 Hawaii State Tax Review Commission.
      E-mail:grandy@hawaii.edu
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Christopher Grandy is an associate professor of public administration at the University of Hawaii (Manoa). After completing a doctorate in economics at the University of California, Berkeley, he taught in the economics departments of Barnard College and the University of Hawaii before working for six years as an economist for the Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. He specializes in public policy and public finance issues, particularly taxation and public budgeting. He was a member of the 2005–2007 Hawaii State Tax Review Commission.
E-mail:grandy@hawaii.edu

Abstract

The New Public Management movement was only the latest demand that public organizations promote efficiency by adopting business methods. There again followed reactions from those arguing that other values, such as equity, citizen participation, and democracy, are as important as efficiency. This article suggests that an economic rather than business perspective on efficiency may usefully contribute to the scholarly conversation. It also suggests that it is “efficient” to identify the public values in play within any given situation.

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