Public Enterprise Reforms in the United States and the People's Republic of China: A Drift toward Constitutionalization and Departmentalization of Enterprise Management

Authors


Hon S. Chan is a professor and head of the Department of Public and Social Administration City University of Hong Kong. His research focuses on civil service and cadre personnel management in the People's Republic of China.
E-mail:hon.chan@cityu.edu.hk

David H. Rosenbloom is Chair Professor of Public Management at the City University of Hong Kong and Distinguished Professor of Public Administration in the School of Public Affairs at American University in Washington, D.C. His scholarship focuses on public administration and democratic constitutionalism, the intellectual history of U.S. public administration, and public administrative theory.
E-mail:rbloom313@hotmail.com

Abstract

Does globalization foster administrative convergence? Is that the case with public enterprise reform in the United States and the People’s Republic of China? Few analyses compare public enterprise reform in the two countries because of their vast differences in regulatory approaches, public policy, and government structure. This article contrasts how American and Chinese public enterprises are developed, defined, and managed, along with their emerging control infrastructures This the resulting strengths and weaknesses. While vast differences remain apparent between the two countries, this essay provides insights into why those gaps persist, and may even continue to grow.

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