What Influences City Council Adoption and Support for Reinventing Government? Environmental or Institutional Factors?

Authors

  • Timothy B. Krebs,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of New Mexico
      Timothy B. Krebs is an associate professor of political science at the University of New Mexico. His research has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, American Politics Research, and Social Science Quarterly, among others. He is currently researching the link between election cycles and fi scal policies in cities, and television advertising in mayoral campaigns.
      E-mail:tbkrebs@unm.edu
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  • John P. Pelissero

    Corresponding author
    1. Loyola University Chicago
      John P. Pelissero is a professor of political science and vice provost at Loyola University Chicago. He is the coauthor of Managing Urban America (6th ed.) and editor of Cities, Politics, and Policy, both published by CQ Press.
      E-mail:jpeliss@luc.edu
    Search for more papers by this author

Timothy B. Krebs is an associate professor of political science at the University of New Mexico. His research has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, American Politics Research, and Social Science Quarterly, among others. He is currently researching the link between election cycles and fi scal policies in cities, and television advertising in mayoral campaigns.
E-mail:tbkrebs@unm.edu

John P. Pelissero is a professor of political science and vice provost at Loyola University Chicago. He is the coauthor of Managing Urban America (6th ed.) and editor of Cities, Politics, and Policy, both published by CQ Press.
E-mail:jpeliss@luc.edu

Abstract

What influences the degree to which city councils support reinventing government (REGO)? Controlling for environmental factors that are likely to shape council policy adoption as well as the tenure of the chief administrator, the findings of this study underscore that the type of representation system is most consistently related to opposition to REGO. In addition, the economic health of the city and the tenure of the chief administrator are positively associated with council support. Overall, institutional factors affect council policy adoption more than either environmental factors or an administrator's seniority, at least in this policy area.

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