Get access

Recovering, Restoring, and Renewing the Foundations of American Public Administration: The Contributions of Herbert J. Storing

Authors

  • Douglas F. Morgan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Portland State University
      Douglas F. Morgan is professor emeritus of public administration at Portland State University and director of the Hatfield School of Government’s Executive Leadership Institute. He is the coauthor of Foundations of Public Service (2008) and has written more than two dozen articles on local government leadership and ethics. He has served on numerous government boards and advisory committees, including the Portland School Board. He is currently undertaking several leadership development projects in Southeast Asia, including the creation of a Leadership for Sustainable Development curriculum funded by the Ford Foundation for the Ho Chi Minh Academy in Vietnam.
      E-mail: morgandf@pdx.edu
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kent A. Kirwan,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Nebraska at Omaha
      Kent A. Kirwan is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. His primary research interests include political philosophy, constitutional law, and public administration. His work has been published in Polity, Publius, Interpretation, Administration & Society, American Journal of Public Administration, Political Science Reviewer, and The Annals, among others. He has written on Storing’s contributions to public administration, as well as articles on Woodrow Wilson, separation of powers, federalism, the Supreme Court, and the political leadership of George Washington.
      E-mail: kentakirwan@gmail.com
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John A. Rohr,

    Corresponding author
    1. Virginia Tech
      John A. Rohr is professor emeritus of public administration and policy in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies at Virginia Tech. He is the author of seven books and dozens of articles on public administration, ethics, and the role of the American Constitution in shaping governing institutions and practices. He has received the Distinguished Research Award from the American Society of Public Administration and the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. He was awarded the prestigious Dwight Waldo Award from the American Society for Public Administration in 2002 for contributions to the literature and leadership of public administration. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and has been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.
      E-mail: jrohr@vt.edu
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David H. Rosenbloom,

    Corresponding author
    1. City University of Hong Kong and American University
      David H. Rosenbloom is Chair Professor of Public Management at City University of Hong Kong and Distinguished Professor of Public Administration at American University. He specializes in public administration and democratic constitutionalism. He is the author of more than 300 publications and the recipient of several awards, including the American Political Science Association’s Gaus Award for exemplary scholarship in the joint tradition of political science and public administration and the American Society for Public Administration’s Waldo Award for outstanding contributions to the literature and leadership of public administration. He was editor in chief of Public Administration Review (1991–96), coeditor of the Policy Studies Journal (1985–90), and currently serves on the editorial boards of about a dozen public administration journals.
      E-mail: rbloom313@hotmail.com
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David Lewis Schaefer

    Corresponding author
    1. College of the Holy Cross
      David Lewis Schaefer is professor of political science at College of the Holy Cross, where he teaches courses on political philosophy and American political thought. A three-time fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, he is author of The Political Philosophy of Montaigne (1990) and Illiberal Justice: John Rawls vs. the American Political Tradition (2007), coeditor of Sir Henry Taylor’s The Statesman (1992), and coeditor of and contributor to The Future of Cities (1996) and Active Duty: Public Administration as Democratic Statesmanship (1998). He is currently editing a book of essays on democratic decision making.
      E-mail: dschaefe@holycross.edu
    Search for more papers by this author

Douglas F. Morgan is professor emeritus of public administration at Portland State University and director of the Hatfield School of Government’s Executive Leadership Institute. He is the coauthor of Foundations of Public Service (2008) and has written more than two dozen articles on local government leadership and ethics. He has served on numerous government boards and advisory committees, including the Portland School Board. He is currently undertaking several leadership development projects in Southeast Asia, including the creation of a Leadership for Sustainable Development curriculum funded by the Ford Foundation for the Ho Chi Minh Academy in Vietnam.
E-mail: morgandf@pdx.edu

Kent A. Kirwan is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. His primary research interests include political philosophy, constitutional law, and public administration. His work has been published in Polity, Publius, Interpretation, Administration & Society, American Journal of Public Administration, Political Science Reviewer, and The Annals, among others. He has written on Storing’s contributions to public administration, as well as articles on Woodrow Wilson, separation of powers, federalism, the Supreme Court, and the political leadership of George Washington.
E-mail: kentakirwan@gmail.com

John A. Rohr is professor emeritus of public administration and policy in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies at Virginia Tech. He is the author of seven books and dozens of articles on public administration, ethics, and the role of the American Constitution in shaping governing institutions and practices. He has received the Distinguished Research Award from the American Society of Public Administration and the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. He was awarded the prestigious Dwight Waldo Award from the American Society for Public Administration in 2002 for contributions to the literature and leadership of public administration. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and has been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.
E-mail: jrohr@vt.edu

David H. Rosenbloom is Chair Professor of Public Management at City University of Hong Kong and Distinguished Professor of Public Administration at American University. He specializes in public administration and democratic constitutionalism. He is the author of more than 300 publications and the recipient of several awards, including the American Political Science Association’s Gaus Award for exemplary scholarship in the joint tradition of political science and public administration and the American Society for Public Administration’s Waldo Award for outstanding contributions to the literature and leadership of public administration. He was editor in chief of Public Administration Review (1991–96), coeditor of the Policy Studies Journal (1985–90), and currently serves on the editorial boards of about a dozen public administration journals.
E-mail: rbloom313@hotmail.com

David Lewis Schaefer is professor of political science at College of the Holy Cross, where he teaches courses on political philosophy and American political thought. A three-time fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, he is author of The Political Philosophy of Montaigne (1990) and Illiberal Justice: John Rawls vs. the American Political Tradition (2007), coeditor of Sir Henry Taylor’s The Statesman (1992), and coeditor of and contributor to The Future of Cities (1996) and Active Duty: Public Administration as Democratic Statesmanship (1998). He is currently editing a book of essays on democratic decision making.
E-mail: dschaefe@holycross.edu

Abstract

Public administration continues to face an identity crisis that turns on the question of whether the animating principles of the discipline are to be discovered in the political foundations of a given regime, or whether they are to be found in more universal and transcendent principles of scientific management. Herbert J. Storing reframed the identity crisis as a problem arising from America’s constitutional system of governance. In doing so, he created an important role for public administration in democratic governance. This role took the form of “closet statesmanship” and, in practice, requires the exercise of prudential judgment that looks more like judicial decision making than scientific management. In summarizing Storing’s writings, the authors convincingly argue that he has much to teach us about the ongoing debate regarding the role of the bureaucracy within America’s 87,576 systems of government.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary