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The Current Status and Roles of State Advisory Commissions on Intergovernmental Relations in the U.S. Federal System

Authors

  • Richard L. Cole

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Texas at Arlington
      Richard L. Cole is a professor in the School of Urban and Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Arlington. His teaching and research interests focus on federalism and intergovernmental relations, both nationally and internationally.
      E-mail:cole@uta.edu
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Richard L. Cole is a professor in the School of Urban and Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Arlington. His teaching and research interests focus on federalism and intergovernmental relations, both nationally and internationally.
E-mail:cole@uta.edu

Abstract

During the 1970s and 1980s, a number of states created entities commonly called advisory commissions on intergovernmental relations (ACIRs). Although as many as half the states at one time or another supported an ACIR, only about 10 do so today. Relying on face-to-face and telephone interviews, e-mail correspondence, website analysis, and mailed surveys of directors and other staff members of active and terminated ACIRs, this study reports on the organization and structure, staffing and finances, and activities and performance characteristics of the state ACIRs still viable today. The study attempts to identify factors that seem most related to successful performance of these agencies, as well as to the termination of the agencies. In conclusion, it speculates on the continued role of state ACIRs.

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