American Indian Tribal Governance and Management: Public Administration Promise or Pretense?

Authors

  • John C. Ronquillo

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Georgia
      John C. Ronquillo is a doctoral candidate in the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Georgia. His primary research interests are public and nonprofi t management, innovation and organizational change, social entrepreneurship, and diversity. He previously worked in the areas of social impact assessment, intergovernmental relations, and public policy analysis, including projects that involved several American Indian communities in Arizona.
      E-mail:johnron@uga.edu
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John C. Ronquillo is a doctoral candidate in the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Georgia. His primary research interests are public and nonprofi t management, innovation and organizational change, social entrepreneurship, and diversity. He previously worked in the areas of social impact assessment, intergovernmental relations, and public policy analysis, including projects that involved several American Indian communities in Arizona.
E-mail:johnron@uga.edu

Abstract

Research on tribal governance in the United States is scarce within modern public administration scholarship. Nonetheless, tribal governance is a pre-Columbian practice that predates the U.S. Constitution and federal law. Drawing from several disciplines, John C. Ronquillo of the University of Georgia demonstrates that interdisciplinary sources offer rich information for present-day public administration research about Native American tribes. Tribal governance literature is definitely not “missing,” but instead is moderately “unassembled” as a subfield of public administration. Building on what is available, the author suggests several key issues within tribal governance in need of urgent academic attention.

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