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Putting Conflict Where It Belongs: A Response to “Creating Shared Responsibility through Respect for Military Culture: The Russian and American Cases”

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  • Amanda Murdie

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    1. Kansas State University
      Amanda Murdie is an assistant professor of political science at Kansas State University. She received her doctorate in political science from Emory University. Her research interests focus on nonstate actors and their effects on world political and developmental outcomes. She has published work on the role of international non-governmental organizations on repression and protest and on the effects of United Nations peacekeepers after civil wars. She is a fellow of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society.
      E-mail:amurdie@ksu.edu
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Amanda Murdie is an assistant professor of political science at Kansas State University. She received her doctorate in political science from Emory University. Her research interests focus on nonstate actors and their effects on world political and developmental outcomes. She has published work on the role of international non-governmental organizations on repression and protest and on the effects of United Nations peacekeepers after civil wars. She is a fellow of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society.
E-mail:amurdie@ksu.edu

Abstract

Professor Dale R. Herspring argues that civil-military relations should move beyond a preoccupation with civilian control; instead, he says, the focus should be on the degree and nature of conflict within civil-military interactions. This alternative theoretical view adds much to the extant literature and allows future work to concentrate both on a more nuanced account of the effects of civil-military relations and, as Professor Herspring does, on the determinants of a “healthy” degree of civil-military conflict. This piece responds to Professor Herspring’s alternative view, arguing that future work building on his framework could incorporate much from within public administration.

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