Collaboration by Deflection: Coping with Spent Nuclear Fuel

Authors

  • Joseph J. Karlesky

    Corresponding author
    1. Franklin and Marshall College
      Joseph J. Karlesky is The Honorable and Mrs. John C. Kunkel Professor of Government at Franklin and Marshall College. He received his doctorate in public law and government from Columbia University. He is coauthor of The State of Academic Science: The Universities in the Nation's Research Effort and coauthor of three editions of the textbook American Government. His teaching and research focus on public policy, particularly the interrelationships between public policy and science and technology and the consequences of these interrelationships for policies in energy and health. He regularly teaches courses in American government, understanding public policy, public policy implementation, and health policy.
      E-mail:joe.karlesky@fandm.edu
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Joseph J. Karlesky is The Honorable and Mrs. John C. Kunkel Professor of Government at Franklin and Marshall College. He received his doctorate in public law and government from Columbia University. He is coauthor of The State of Academic Science: The Universities in the Nation's Research Effort and coauthor of three editions of the textbook American Government. His teaching and research focus on public policy, particularly the interrelationships between public policy and science and technology and the consequences of these interrelationships for policies in energy and health. He regularly teaches courses in American government, understanding public policy, public policy implementation, and health policy.
E-mail:joe.karlesky@fandm.edu

Abstract

For more than three decades, the U.S. national government has wrestled with the problem of siting a central repository for high-level radioactive waste, most of it spent fuel from nuclear power plants. Scholars and practitioners recommend a collaborative and participative approach to the siting process to ensure accountability and representativeness, but the search for a working repository so far has been unsuccessful. Consequently, more nuclear power plants must add or expand dry cask facilities to store accumulating amounts of spent fuel. Are collaboration and accountability and successful execution of results possible in state decisions on dry cask storage in a way that they have eluded the central siting process? The special characteristics of dispersed dry cask storage, in contrast to transporting the waste to a central repository, can facilitate collaboration and accountability, as decisions on dry cask storage in Minnesota and Vermont demonstrate.

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