Reputation and Public Administration

Authors

  • Daniel P. Carpenter,

    Corresponding author
    1. Harvard University
    • Daniel P. Carpenter is Allie S. Freed Professor of Government at Harvard University. He combines narrative and mathematical methods in the analysis of public agencies. His books include The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputations, Networks and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862–1928 (2001) and Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA (2010). In 2011, he received the Herbert Simon Award from the Midwest Caucus for Public Administration for his “significant career contribution to the scientific study of bureaucracy.”
      E-mail:dcarpenter@gov.harvard.edu

      George A. Krause is professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the author of A Two-Way Street: The Institutional Dynamics of the Modern Administrative State (1999) and the coauthor of The Diversity Paradox: Political Parties, Legislatures, and the Organizational Foundations of Representation in America (2012). His primary research interests are public bureaucracy, executive politics, organizational theory, political economics, and decision making.
      E-mail:gkrause@pitt.edu

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  • George A. Krause

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Pittsburgh
    • Daniel P. Carpenter is Allie S. Freed Professor of Government at Harvard University. He combines narrative and mathematical methods in the analysis of public agencies. His books include The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputations, Networks and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862–1928 (2001) and Reputation and Power: Organizational Image and Pharmaceutical Regulation at the FDA (2010). In 2011, he received the Herbert Simon Award from the Midwest Caucus for Public Administration for his “significant career contribution to the scientific study of bureaucracy.”
      E-mail:dcarpenter@gov.harvard.edu

      George A. Krause is professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the author of A Two-Way Street: The Institutional Dynamics of the Modern Administrative State (1999) and the coauthor of The Diversity Paradox: Political Parties, Legislatures, and the Organizational Foundations of Representation in America (2012). His primary research interests are public bureaucracy, executive politics, organizational theory, political economics, and decision making.
      E-mail:gkrause@pitt.edu

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

This article examines the application of organizational reputation to public administration. Organizational reputation is defined as a set of beliefs about an organization’s capacities, intentions, history, and mission that are embedded in a network of multiple audiences. The authors assert that the way in which organizational reputations are formed and subsequently cultivated is fundamental to understanding the role of public administration in a democracy. A review of the basic assumptions and empirical work on organizational reputation in the public sector identifies a series of stylized facts that extends our understanding of the functioning of public agencies. In particular, the authors examine the relationship between organizational reputation and bureaucratic autonomy.

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