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Objective

This study explores variation in stereotypes of U.S. immigrants from Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, and Asia.

Method

We exploit a split-ballot design in two waves of the Ohio Poll to test hypotheses about effects of contextual and respondent-level characteristics on immigrant stereotypes.

Results

Respondents generally rated Asian immigrants most positively and Latin American immigrants most negatively, with European and Middle Eastern immigrants occupying an intermediate position. Findings from regression analyses indicate little direct effect of county-level percent foreign born or media consumption. The strongest effects observed were income on stereotypes of Middle Eastern and Asian immigrants and concerns about the problem of unauthorized immigration on stereotypes of Latin American and Middle Eastern immigrants.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest that views about the characteristics of certain groups of immigrants are strongly linked to national-level debates about unauthorized immigration.