CLUMSY SOLUTIONS FOR A COMPLEX WORLD: THE CASE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Authors

  • MARCO VERWEIJ,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • 9 MARY DOUGLAS,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • 1 RICHARD ELLIS,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • 2 CHRISTOPH ENGEL,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • 3 FRANK HENDRIKS,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • 4 SUSANNE LOHMANN,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • 5 STEVEN NEY,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • 6 STEVE RAYNER,

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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  • and 7 MICHAEL THOMPSON 8

    1. 1 Mary Douglas is a retired Professor of Anthropology at University College London. 2Richard Ellis is Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, Salem. 3Christoph Engel is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn. 4Frank Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Tilburg. 5Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science at UCLA. 6Steven Ney is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Singapore Management University. 7Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor and Director of the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at the University of Oxford. 8Michael Thompson is Director of the Musgrave Institute in London, Fellow in the James Martin Institute at the University of Oxford, Institute Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg Austria and Adjunct Professor at the Stein Rokkan Centre at the University of Bergen. 9Marco Verweij is Professor of Political Science at the International University Bremen.
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Abstract

Successful solutions to pressing social ills tend to consist of innovative combinations of a limited set of alternative ways of perceiving and resolving the issues. These contending policy perspectives justify, represent and stem from four different ways of organizing social relations: hierarchy, individualism, egalitarianism and fatalism. Each of these perspectives: (1) distils certain elements of experience and wisdom that are missed by the others; (2) provides a clear expression of the way in which a significant portion of the populace feels we should live with one another and with nature; and (3) needs all of the others in order to be sustainable. ‘Clumsy solutions’– policies that creatively combine all opposing perspectives on what the problems are and how they should be resolved – are therefore called for. We illustrate these claims for the issue of global warming.

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