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Reduction of Pacemaker Pressure Symptoms Using Nonantigenic Preserved Human Dermis Grafts

Authors

  • ROSS RUDOLPH M.D.,

    1. Divisions of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Scripps Clinic and the University of California San Diego, and of Cardiovascular Diseases at Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, California
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  • MICHAEL SMITH M.D.,

    1. Divisions of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Scripps Clinic and the University of California San Diego, and of Cardiovascular Diseases at Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, California
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  • GUY CURTIS M.D., Ph.D.

    1. Divisions of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Scripps Clinic and the University of California San Diego, and of Cardiovascular Diseases at Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, California
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Address for reprints: Guy Curtis, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Cardiology, Scripps Clinic, 10666 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla CA 92037. Fax: (858) 554-9767; e-mail: Curtis.Guy@scrippshealth.org

Abstract

Skin pressure symptoms can occur in thin patients with pacemakers, with erosion through the skin surface a possibility. To correct this problem without device removal, two patients had nonantigenic preserved human dermis grafts placed over their pacemakers. This acellular nonantigenic human dermal substitute provided significant thickness over the devices and improvement in pressure symptoms.

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