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Comparison of Two Different Speckle Tracking Software Systems: Does the Method Matter?

Authors


  • Conflicts of interest: None.

  • Author Contributions: Patric Biaggi: (1) research design, acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data; (2) drafting the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Shemy Carasso: (1) acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Patrick Garceau: (1) acquisition of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Matthias Greutmann: (1) acquisition of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Christiane Gruner: (1) acquisition of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Wendy Tsang: (1) acquisition of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Harry Rakowski: (1) research design, interpretation of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Yoram Agmon: (1) research design, interpretation of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version. Anna Woo: (1) research design, interpretation of data; (2) revising the paper; (3) approval of the submitted and final version.

Address for correspondence and reprint requests: Patric Biaggi, M.D., Division of Cardiology, Toronto General Hospital, Peter Munk Cardiac Program, North Wing, 4N-506, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada. Fax: 416 340 3959; E-mail: pbiaggi@gmx.ch

Abstract

Background: Echocardiographic speckle tracking strain has gained clinical importance. However, the comparability of measurements between different software systems is not well defined. Methods: In 47 healthy subjects left ventricular (LV) two-dimensional (2D) peak strain and time to peak strain (TTP) generated by EchoPAC (2DS) and velocity vector imaging (VVI) were compared. For each type of strain (longitudinal [LS], circumferential [CS], and radial strain [RS]) we compared global, anatomical level and segmental values. Results: When comparing 2DS to VVI, Pearson correlation coefficients (r) of global LS, CS, and RS were 0.68, 0.44, and 0.59, respectively (all P < 0.05). Correlation of global TTP was higher: 0.81(LS), 0.80 (CS), and 0.68 (RS), all P < 0.01. Segmental peak strain differed significantly between 2DS and VVI in 8/18 (LS), 17/18 (CS), and 15/18 (RS) LV segments (P < 0.05). However, segmental TTP significantly differed only in 5/18 (LS), 7/18 (CS), and 4/18 (RS) of LV segments. Similar strain gradients were found for both systems: apical strain was higher than basal and midventricular strain in LS and CS, with a reversed pattern for RS (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TTP strain as well as strain gradients were comparable between VVI and 2DS, but most peak strain values were not. The software-dependency of peak strain values must be considered in clinical application. Further studies comparing the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of strain values generated by different software systems are mandatory. (Echocardiography 2011;28:539-547)

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