Facial Porokeratosis

Authors


Dafnis C. Carranza, MD, UCLA Division of Dermatology, 200 UCLA Medical Plaza Suite 450, Los Angeles, CA 90095
E-mail: dafniscarranza@yahoo.com

Abstract

A 34-year-old man from El Salvador was referred to our clinic with a 10-year history of a pruritic erythematous facial eruption. He reported increased pruritus and scaling of lesions when exposed to the sun. He worked as a construction worker and admitted to frequent sun exposure. Physical examination revealed well-circumscribed erythematous to violaceous papules with raised borders and atrophic centers localized to the nose (Figure 1). He did not have lesions on the arms or legs. He did not report a family history of similar lesions. A biopsy specimen was obtained from the edge of a lesion on the right ala. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimen showed acanthosis of the epidermis with focal invagination of the corneal layer and a homogeneous column of parakeratosis in the center of that layer consistent with a cornoid lamella (Figure 2). Furthermore, the granular layer was absent at the cornoid lamella base. The superficial dermis contained a sparse, perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. No evidence of dysplasia or malignancy was seen. These findings supported a diagnosis of porokeratosis. The patient underwent a trial of cryotherapy with moderate improvement of the facial lesions.

Figure 1.

Figure 1.

Circumsribed erythematous papules with raised borders and atrophic centers.

Figure 2.

Figure 2.

(A) Skin biopsy specimen from the edge of the right ala showing hyperkeratosis and focal porokerastosis (hematoxylineosin stain, original magnification ×200). (B) Typical cornoid lamella (hematoxylineosin stain, original magnification ×400).

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