Impacts of Market Liberalization on Regulatory Network: A Longitudinal Analysis of the Swiss Telecommunications Sector

Authors

  • Manuel Fischer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Political Science and International Relations, University of Geneva, Switzerland
      Manuel Fischer is a teaching assistant at the department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Geneva. He has a PhD from the University of Geneva. He worked as a research assistant within the research project “The Swiss decision-making system in the 21st century: power, institutions, conflicts” at the University of Geneva and was a visiting scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) with a “Young Scholar Scholarship” from the Swiss Science Foundation. His research fields are Swiss politics, Europeanization, and the application and modeling of social network analysis.
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  • Karin Ingold,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Political Science at the University of Bern with an affiliation to the Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research and the Swiss Federal Institute on Aquatic Research and Technology (EAWAG)
      Karin Ingold is assistant professor at the Institute of Political Science at the University of Bern with an affiliation to the Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research and the Swiss Federal Institute on Aquatic Research and Technology (EAWAG). She leads the Policy Analysis group with a special focus on the environment. Her research focuses on policy process theories, the liberalization of utility sectors, climate policy and natural resource management, and the application of social network analysis.
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  • Pascal Sciarini,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Political Science and International Relations, University of Geneva, Switzerland
      Pascal Sciarini is a full professor of Swiss politics and European integration at the Department of Political Science and International Relations, University of Geneva, Switzerland. His research and teaching focus on the Swiss political system, political institutions, Europeanization, and European integration. Pascal Sciarini is an expert in the analysis of direct democratic instruments, survey design, and public opinion building. He was Director of the Department until 2011.
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  • Frédéric Varone

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Political Science and International Relations, University of Geneva, Switzerland
      Frédéric Varone is full professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Geneva. As an economist and a political expert, Varone has taught in the Universities of Berne, Lausanne, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium), Lille (France), and Geneva, as well as in several continued trainings for functionaries: in Brussels, Paris, and Munich in particular. He is presently heading the Master in Public Management (MAP) of the University of Geneva, as well as the European Network of Universities offering master's programs in Comparative Public Administration (EMPA). He is a member of various commissions of experts focusing in particular on the evaluation of public policies.
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Manuel Fischer is a teaching assistant at the department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Geneva. He has a PhD from the University of Geneva. He worked as a research assistant within the research project “The Swiss decision-making system in the 21st century: power, institutions, conflicts” at the University of Geneva and was a visiting scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) with a “Young Scholar Scholarship” from the Swiss Science Foundation. His research fields are Swiss politics, Europeanization, and the application and modeling of social network analysis.

Karin Ingold is assistant professor at the Institute of Political Science at the University of Bern with an affiliation to the Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research and the Swiss Federal Institute on Aquatic Research and Technology (EAWAG). She leads the Policy Analysis group with a special focus on the environment. Her research focuses on policy process theories, the liberalization of utility sectors, climate policy and natural resource management, and the application of social network analysis.

Pascal Sciarini is a full professor of Swiss politics and European integration at the Department of Political Science and International Relations, University of Geneva, Switzerland. His research and teaching focus on the Swiss political system, political institutions, Europeanization, and European integration. Pascal Sciarini is an expert in the analysis of direct democratic instruments, survey design, and public opinion building. He was Director of the Department until 2011.

Frédéric Varone is full professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Geneva. As an economist and a political expert, Varone has taught in the Universities of Berne, Lausanne, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium), Lille (France), and Geneva, as well as in several continued trainings for functionaries: in Brussels, Paris, and Munich in particular. He is presently heading the Master in Public Management (MAP) of the University of Geneva, as well as the European Network of Universities offering master's programs in Comparative Public Administration (EMPA). He is a member of various commissions of experts focusing in particular on the evaluation of public policies.

Abstract

This article looks at the reconfiguration of the regulatory actors' network, as induced by the liberalization and reregulation processes in utility sectors. It investigates the changes in governance structures and patterns of collaborative ties between actors resulting from these processes. Applying stochastic actor-oriented modeling (SAOM) to data on the liberalization of the Swiss telecommunications sector over two decades, we test whether and to what extent structural changes driven by liberalization and reregulation express themselves through network effects, that is, through changing patterns of interactions between political authorities, regulators, regulatees, and interest groups. Our empirical tests highlight a rearrangement of the regulatory network and a reorganization of relational patterns around new actors, such as the sector-specific regulatory agency, coregulators, and new operators.

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