SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Ahrens, J. (2002). Governance and economic development: A comparative institutional approach. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.
  • Ammar, S. (1997). Can a developing democracy manage its macroeconomy: The case of Thailand. In Thailand's boom and bust. Bangkok: Thailand Development Research Institute.
  • Barzelay, M. (1986). The politicized market economy: Alcohol in Brazil's energy strategy. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Basinger, S., & Hallerberg, M. (2004). Remodeling the competition for capital: How domestic politics erases the race to the bottom. American Political Science Review, 98(2), 261276.
  • Bates, R. H. (1988). Contra Contractarianism: Some reflections on the new institutionalism. Politics and Society, 16, 387401.
  • Bates, R. H. (1995). Social dilemmas and rational individuals: An assessment of the new institutionalism. In J.Harriss, J.Hunter, & C. Lewis (Eds.), The new institutional economics and third world development (pp. 2748). New York: Routledge.
  • Bidhya, B. (2001). Thailand: Bureaucracy under coalition governments. In J.Burns & B.Bidhya (Eds.), Civil service systems in Asia (pp. 281318). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.
  • Breznitz, D. (2007). Innovation and the State: Political choice and strategies for growth in Israel, Taiwan and Ireland. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Brimble, P., & Doner, R. F. (2007). University-industry linkages and economic development: The case of Thailand. World Development, 35(6), 10211036.
  • Bueno de Mesquita, B., Smith, A., Siverson, R. M., & Morrow, J. D. (2003). The logic of political survival. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Campos, J. E., & Root, H. L. (1996). The key to the Asian miracle. Washington, DC: Brookings.
  • Careaga, M., & Weingast, B. R. (2003). Fiscal federalism, good governance, and economic growth in Mexico. In D.Rodrik (Ed.), In search of prosperity: Analytic narratives on economic growth (pp. 399438). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Chalmers, I. (2003). Cabinet coalitions and the durability of parties and factions: 1979–2001. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Northern Illinois.
  • Chalmers, I. (2006). Factions, parties, and the durability of parliaments, coalitions, and cabinets: The case of Thailand (1979–2001). Unpublished manuscript.
  • Cohen, S. S., Di Minin, A., Motoyama, Y., & Palmberg, C. (2009). The persistence of home bias for important R&D in wireless telecom and automobiles. Review of Policy Research, 26(1,2), 5576.
  • Cohen, W. M., & Levinthal, D. A. (1990). Absorptive capacity: a new perspective on leearning and innovation. Administrative Science Quarterly, 35, 128152.
  • Cox, G., & McCubbins, M. (2000). The institutional determinants of economic policy outcomes. In S.Haggard & M.McCubbins (Eds.), Structure and policy in presidential democracies (pp. 2163). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Doner, R. (2009). The politics of uneven development: Thailand's economic growth in comparative perspective. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Doner, R., & Ramsay, A. (2009). The sugar industry. In R.Doner (Ed.), The politics of uneven development: Thailand's economic growth in comparative perspective (chap. 5). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Doner, R., Ritchie, B., & Slater, D. (2005). Systemic vulnerability and the origins of developmental states: Northeast and Southeast Asia in comparative perspective. International Organization, 59(2), 327362.
  • Economic Development Board. (2005). Heart work. Singapore: EDB.
  • Evans, P. (1995). Embedded autonomy: States and industrial transformation. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Fields, K. (2007). Strong states and business organization in Korea and Taiwan. In S.Maxfield & B. R.Schneider (Eds.), Business and the state in developing countries (pp. 122152). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Fry, G. W. (2002). Synthesis report: From crisis to opportunity, the challenges of educational reform in Thailand. Study prepared for the Office of the National Education Commission and the Asian Development Bank, Bangkok.
  • Geddes, B. (1994). Politicians' dilemma. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Gereffi, G. (2005). The global economy: Organization, governance, and development. In N.Smelser & R.Swedberg (Eds.), The Handbook of economic sociology (pp. 160182). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Gershenkron, A. (1962). Economic backwardness in historical perspective. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Hallerberg, M. (2002). Veto players and the choice of monetary institutions. International Organization, 56, 775802.
  • Heinisz, W. J. (2000). The institutional environment for economic growth. Economics and Politics, 12, 131.
  • Hicken, A. (2002). Party systems, political institutions and policy: Policymaking in developing democracies. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of California, San Diego.
  • Hicken, A. (2006). Party fabrication: Constitutional reform and the rise of Thai Rak Thai. Journal of East Asian Studies, 6(3), 381408.
  • Hicken, A., & Ritchie, B. (2002, August). The origin of credibility enhancing institutions in Southeast Asia. Paper presented at the annual APSA Meeting, Boston, MA.
  • Hill, H. (2004). Technology and innovation in East Asia. In S.Yusuf, A.Altaf, & K.Nabeshina (Eds.), Global production networking and technological change in East Asia (pp. 353394). New York: Oxford University Press for the World Bank.
  • Hoff, K., & Stiglitz, J. E. (2001). Modern economic theory and development. In G. M.Meier (Ed.), Frontiers of development economics: The future in perspective (pp. 389459). New York: World Bank and Oxford University Press.
  • Kang, D. C. (2002). Crony capitalism: Corruption and development in South Korea and the Philippines. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Katzenstein, P. J. (1985). Small states in world markets. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Keefer, P. (2004). What does political economy tell us about economic development—and vice versa. Annual Review of Political Science, 7, 247272.
  • Ketokivi, M., & Ali-Yrkkö, J. (2009). Unbundling R&D and manufacturing: Post-industrial myth or economic reality? Review of Policy Research, 26(1,2), 3554.
  • Knight, J. (1992). Institutions and social conflict. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Kuznetsov, Y. (2004, November). Chile: Towards a pragmatic innovation agenda. Paper presentation at the Development Policy Review Workshop, World Bank Institute, Santiago, Chile.
  • Lake, D., & Baum, M. (2001). Invisible hand of democracy: Political control and public service provision. Comparative Political Studies, 34, 587621.
  • Lall, S. (2000). Technological change and industrialization in the Asian newly industrializing economies: Achievements and challenges. In L.Kim & R.Nelson (Eds.), Technology, learning and innovation: Experiences of newly industrializing economies (pp. 1268). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Lauridsen, L. (2002). Struggling with globalization in Thailand: Accumulation, learning, or market competition. South East Asia Research, 10(2), 155183.
  • MacIntyre, A. J. (2002). The power of institutions: Political architecture and governance. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • McCargo, D. (2002). Democracy under stress in Thaksin's Thailand. Journal of Democracy, 13(4), 126.
  • McKendrick, D., Doner, R. F., & Haggard, S. (2000). From Silicon Valley to Singapore: The competitive advantage of location in the hard disk drive industry. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • National Education Commission (NEC). (2000). Education in Thailand: 2000–2001. Bangkok: Office of the National Education Commission.
  • Nelson, R. (1993). National innovation systems: A comparative analysis. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Nipon, P., & Somkiat, T. (2001). Industrial restructuring in Thailand: A critical assessment. In S.Masuyama, D.Vandenbrink, & C. S.Yue (Eds.), Industrial restructuring in East Asia: Towards the 21st century (pp. 108138). Tokyo: Nomura Research Institute.
  • North, D. C., & Weingast, B. R. (1989). Constitution and commitment: The evaluation of institutions governing public choice in seventeenth-century England. Journal of Economic History, 49, 803832.
  • Nunberg, B. (1986). Structural change and state policy: The politics of sugar in Brazil since 1964. Latin American Research Review, 21(2), 5392.
  • Ockey, J. (2004). Making democracy: Leadership, class, gender, and political participation in Thailand. Bangkok: Silkworm Books for University of Hawaii Press.
  • Overholt, W. H. (1999). Thailand's financial and political systems: Crisis and rejuvenation. Asian Survey, 39(6), 10091035.
  • Pasuk, P., & Baker, C. (1998). Thailand's boom and bust. Chiang Mai: Silkworm Books.
  • Pasuk, P., & Baker, C. (2000). Thailand's crisis. Bangkok: Silkworm Books.
  • Pasuk, P., & Sungsidh , P. (1994). Corruption and democracy in Thailand. Chiang Mai: Silkworm Books.
  • Perrson, T., & Tabellini, G. (2003). The economic effect of constitutions: what do they say? Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Ritchie, B. (2001). Innovation systems, collective dilemmas, and the formation of technical intellectual capital in Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. International Journal of Business and Society, 2(2), 2148.
  • Ritchie, B. (2008). Economic upgrading in a state-coordinated, liberal market economy. Asia Pacific Journal of Management. Retrieved November 14, 2008 from http://www.springerlink.com/content/h39300971t16nn90/
  • Rodrik, D. (2007). One economics many recipes: Globalization, institutions and economic growth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Saint, W. (1982). Farming for energy: Social options under Brazil's National Alcohol Program. World Development, 10(3), 223238.
  • Schein, E. H. (1996). Strategic pragmatism: The culture of Singapore's Economic Development Board. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Schneider, B. R., & Maxfield, S. (1997). Business, the State, and economic performance in developing countries. In S.Maxfield & B. R.Schneider (Eds.), Business and the State in developing countries (pp. 335). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Simmons, J. (2008). Parties, time horizons, and the pursuit of economic growth through technological development. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Michigan.
  • Somporn, T. (2004). Some signs of progress. Bangkok Post Mid-Year Economic Review, available at http://www.bangkokpost.com/midyear2004/hmresources02.html
  • Technical tour: Copersucar technology center. (2002, December). Paper presented at the 3rd Lamnet Workshop, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
  • Thelen, K. (2003). How institutions evolve: Insights from comparative historical analysis. In J.Mahoney & D.Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences (pp. 208240). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Thitinan, P. (2001). Crisis from within: The politics of macroeconomic management in Thailand, 1947–97. PhD thesis, Department of International Relations, London School of Economics.
  • Tsebelis, G. (2002). Veto players: How political institutions work. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Vartiainen, J. (1999). The economics of successful state intervention in industrial transformation. In M.Woo-Cumings (Ed.), The developmental state (pp. 200235). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Waldner, D. (1999). State building and late development. Ithaca, NY: Cor nell University Press.
  • Warr, P. (1998). Thailand. In R. H.McLeod & R.Garnaut (Eds.), East Asia in crisis: From being in a miracle to needing one? (pp. 4965). London; New York: Routledge.
  • World Bank. (1993). The East Asian miracle: Economic growth and public policy. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • World Bank. (2006). Thailand economic monitor. Bangkok: World Bank.
  • Yusuf, S. (2003). Innovative East Asia: The future of growth. New York: Oxford University Press and the World Bank.