Incorporating a Modified Problem-Based Learning Exercise in a Traditional Lecture and Lab-Based Dairy Products Course

Authors

  • Andrea M. Liceaga,

    1. Authors Liceaga and Ballard are with Dept. of Food Science, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. Author Skura is with Food, Nutrition & Health, The Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4, Canada. Direct inquiries to author Liceaga (E-mail: aliceaga@.edu ).
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  • Tameshia S. Ballard,

    1. Authors Liceaga and Ballard are with Dept. of Food Science, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. Author Skura is with Food, Nutrition & Health, The Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4, Canada. Direct inquiries to author Liceaga (E-mail: aliceaga@.edu ).
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  • Brent J. Skura

    1. Authors Liceaga and Ballard are with Dept. of Food Science, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. Author Skura is with Food, Nutrition & Health, The Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4, Canada. Direct inquiries to author Liceaga (E-mail: aliceaga@.edu ).
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Abstract

Abstract:  A modified problem-based learning (PBL) exercise was implemented in a food science Dairy Products course, which had previously been taught in the traditional lecture and laboratory format only. The first 10 wk of the course consisted of weekly lectures and laboratory exercises. During the remaining 3 wk, students were presented with a case study that described milk quality problems that could be encountered by the dairy industry. Each week, students received a set of case disclosures containing relevant information that assisted in solving the case. Students were asked to present their findings at the end of the course in the form of a written “consultant's report.” In addition, students were given a survey asking for feedback on the PBL exercise, and the usefulness of having the lectures and labs prior to the PBL experience. Eighty percent of the students found that lectures and labs provided them with sufficient background knowledge to understand and solve the PBL case, 70% found that the PBL reinforced course material covered during lecture and labs, 50% responded that PBL helped them develop new ways of reasoning about the subject matter and 65% reported that PBL taught them to think critically. Of the total students surveyed, 56% would prefer to participate in similar types of PBL exercises in the future. Incorporating PBL into traditionally taught food science courses can have a positive influence on the learning process.

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