A New Frontier in Soy Bioactive Peptides that May Prevent Age-related Chronic Diseases

Authors

  • Wenyi Wang,

    1. Authors Wang and Mejia are with Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 228 ERML, MC-051, 1202 West Gregory Drive, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801.
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  • Elvira Gonzalez De Mejia

    1. Authors Wang and Mejia are with Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 228 ERML, MC-051, 1202 West Gregory Drive, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801.
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  • Direct inquiries to author Gonzalez de Mejia (E-mail: edemejia@uiuc.edu).

  • Acknowledgments The authors express their gratefulness to the USDA-Future Foods Initiative and Hatch funds for their support.

ABSTRACT

During gastrointestinal digestion or food processing of proteins, small peptides can be released and may act as regulatory compounds with hormone-like activities. Numerous biologically active peptides (bioactive peptides) have been identified. Most bioactive peptides are derived from milk and dairy products, with the most common being angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory peptides. Soybean protein and soybean derived peptides also play an important role in soybean physiological activities, particularly those related to the prevention of chronic diseases. However, the bioactive potential of soybean derived bioactive peptides is yet to be fully appreciated. After a general introduction of approaches and advances in bioactive peptides from food sources, this review focuses on bioactive peptides derived from soybean proteins and their physiological properties. Technological approaches to generate bioactive peptides, their isolation, purification, characterization, and quantification, and further application in food and drug design are also presented. Safety concerns, such as potential toxicity, allergenicity, and sensory aspect of these peptides are likewise discussed.

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