Ontario Child Health Study: Reliability and Validity of the General Functioning Subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device

Authors

  • JOHN BYLES D.S.W.,

    1. We regret the death of Dr. John Byles since the completion of this article. He will be missed.
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  • CAROLYN BYRNE M.H.Sc., R.N.,

    1. These authors are members of the Child Epidemiology Unit: Dr. Offord is Director of the Unit and Michael Boyle is a Research Associate. Send reprint requests to Dr. Offord, Child Epidemiology Unit, Chedoke Division, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Box 2000, Station A, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 325.
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  • MICHAEL H. BOYLE M.Sc,

    1. These authors are members of the Child Epidemiology Unit: Dr. Offord is Director of the Unit and Michael Boyle is a Research Associate. Send reprint requests to Dr. Offord, Child Epidemiology Unit, Chedoke Division, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Box 2000, Station A, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 325.
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  • DAVID R. OFFORD M.D.

    1. These authors are members of the Child Epidemiology Unit: Dr. Offord is Director of the Unit and Michael Boyle is a Research Associate. Send reprint requests to Dr. Offord, Child Epidemiology Unit, Chedoke Division, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Box 2000, Station A, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 325.
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  • This work was supported by funds from the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services and was carried out by the Child Epidemiology Unit, Department of Psychiatry, McMaster University, and the Child Family Center, Chedoke Division, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

The reliability and validity of the 12-item General Functioning (GF) subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD) is reported here. Psychometric properties of the FAD have been previously determined, but no independent assessment has been made of the GF subscale, which was used to measure family functioning in the Ontario Child Health Study (OCHS). Reliability was measured by Chronbach's alpha and split-half correlation. Validity was assessed by hypothesizing the relationships expected between the GF scores and other family variables included in the OCHS data set. The results indicate good reliability, and all hypotheses of validity were supported. The brevity and ease of administering the GF subscale recommend it for further use in survey research in which a global assessment of family functioning is required.

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