Evaluating FACES III and the Circumplex Model: 2,440 Families

Authors

  • ROBERT G. GREEN Ph.D.,

    1. Dr. Green is a Professor, Dr. Harris an Assistant Professor, and Mrs. Robinson a doctoral student and adjunct faculty member at the School of Social Work of Virginia Commonwealth University. Correspondence may be directed to the first author at the School of Social Work, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1001 West Franklin Street, Box 2027, Richmond VA 23284.
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  • ROBERT N. HARRIS JR., Ph.D.,

    1. Dr. Green is a Professor, Dr. Harris an Assistant Professor, and Mrs. Robinson a doctoral student and adjunct faculty member at the School of Social Work of Virginia Commonwealth University. Correspondence may be directed to the first author at the School of Social Work, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1001 West Franklin Street, Box 2027, Richmond VA 23284.
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  • JAMES A. FORTE Ph.D.,

    1. Assistant Professor, Christopher Newport College, Newport News VA.
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  • MARGARET ROBINSON M.S.W.

    1. Dr. Green is a Professor, Dr. Harris an Assistant Professor, and Mrs. Robinson a doctoral student and adjunct faculty member at the School of Social Work of Virginia Commonwealth University. Correspondence may be directed to the first author at the School of Social Work, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1001 West Franklin Street, Box 2027, Richmond VA 23284.
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  • The data used in this study were collected by the Virginia National Guard Family Research and Service Project through a contract with the Virginia National Guard, Department of Military Affairs. The authors wish to express their thanks for the support and assistance provided by Mrs. Dorothy Ogilvy-Lee, Chief, Office of Family Policy of the United States National Guard Bureau, and Captain David Archer, Family Support Coordinator of the Virginia National Guard.

Abstract

Previous evaluations of the Circumplex Model's curvilinear hypothesis using FACES instruments have yielded conflicting results. A review of the different research procedures and samples used in those investigations revealed that none of the studies had samples large and/or heterogenous enough to test the curvilinear hypothesis adequately. The present study evaluates the curvilinear hypothesis of family functioning and the concurrent validity of FACES III with a sample of optimal size (N = 2,440 families) and diversity. The lack of support for the curvilinear hypothesis in this “greenhouse” sample is explained by different findings for the two FACES III subscales. There was no relationship between the study's measures of well-being and the adaptability subscale and a linear relationship between these measures and the cohesion subscale. Implications of these findings for the continuing use of the FACES III and for the Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems are discussed.

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