Nurse Characteristics and Professional Autonomy

Authors

  • Karen Kelly Schutzenhofer,

    1. Karen Kelly Schutzenhofer, RN, CNAA, EdD, Epsilon Eta and Nu Chi, is Administrative Supervisor at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Belleville, Illinois and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Donna Bridgman Musser, RN, MS, Epsilon Eta and Nu Chi, is a doctoral student in political science and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Special thanks go to Dr. Mary M. Castles for her encouragement and support. This project was funded by a grant from Sigma Theta Tau International. Correspondence to Dr. Schutzenhofer at 1301 Winding Creek Court, OFallon, Illinois 62269.
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  • Donna Bridgman Musser

    1. Karen Kelly Schutzenhofer, RN, CNAA, EdD, Epsilon Eta and Nu Chi, is Administrative Supervisor at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Belleville, Illinois and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Donna Bridgman Musser, RN, MS, Epsilon Eta and Nu Chi, is a doctoral student in political science and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Special thanks go to Dr. Mary M. Castles for her encouragement and support. This project was funded by a grant from Sigma Theta Tau International. Correspondence to Dr. Schutzenhofer at 1301 Winding Creek Court, OFallon, Illinois 62269.
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Abstract

Relationships between selected demographic characteristics and professional nursing autonomy were examined. Identification of such relationships can strengthen development of the professional nursing role. Usable responses were returned by 542 RNs in a random sample of 2,000 nurses from four states. The Personal Attributes Questionnaire (Spence, Helmreich, & Stapp, 1974) and Nursing Activity Scale (Schutzenhofer, 1987) were used. Significant relationships were noted among autonomy and the following: nursing education, practice setting, clinical specialty, functional role, membership in professional organizations, and gender stereotyped personality traits.

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