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The Interface of Genomic Technologies and Nursing

Authors

  • Lois J. Loescher,

    1. Lois J. Loescher, RN, PhD, Beta Mu, Assistant Professor, Arizona Cancer Center; Carrie Merkle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Beta Upsilon & Beta Mu, Associate Professor, Southern Veterans Administration Health Care System; both at University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, AZ. The authors acknowledge David Montgomery, Jean Jenkins, Mindy Tinkle, Kathleen Calzone, Suzanne Feetham, and Elizabeth Thomson for their comments on this paper. Correspondence to Dr. Loescher, College of Nursing, University of Arizona, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ 85721-0203. E-mail: loescher@nursing.arizona.edu
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  • Carrie J. Merkle

    1. Lois J. Loescher, RN, PhD, Beta Mu, Assistant Professor, Arizona Cancer Center; Carrie Merkle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Beta Upsilon & Beta Mu, Associate Professor, Southern Veterans Administration Health Care System; both at University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, AZ. The authors acknowledge David Montgomery, Jean Jenkins, Mindy Tinkle, Kathleen Calzone, Suzanne Feetham, and Elizabeth Thomson for their comments on this paper. Correspondence to Dr. Loescher, College of Nursing, University of Arizona, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ 85721-0203. E-mail: loescher@nursing.arizona.edu
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Abstract

Purposes: (a) to summarize views of the interface of technology, genomic technology, and nursing; (b) provide an overview of current and emerging genomic technologies; (c) present clinical exemplars of uses of genomic technology in two disease conditions; and (d) list genomic-focused nursing research on genomic technologies.

Organizing Framework: A discussion of genomic technology in the context of nurses' views of technology, the importance of genomic technology for nurses, linking the central dogma of molecular biology to state-of-the-art tests and assays, and nurses' current use of technologies.

Conclusions: Human genome discoveries will continue to be an integral part of disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management. These discoveries also have the potential for being integrated into nursing science. Genomic technologies are becoming a driving force in patient management, so that nurses will be unable to provide quality care without knowledge of the types of genomic technologies, the rationale for their use, and the possible sequelae that can result from genetic diagnosis or treatment. Many nurses already are using genomic technologies to conduct genomic-focused nursing research. The biobehavioral nature of much of this research further indicates the important contributions of nurses in genomics.

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