Symptom Interactions as Mechanisms Underlying Symptom Pairs and Clusters

Authors

  • Kathy P. Parker,

    1. Kathy P. Parker, RN, PhD, FAAN, Alpha Epsilon, Edith F. Honeycutt Professor and Director, Center for Research on Symptoms, Symptom Interactions, and Health Outcomes; Laura P. Kimble, RN, PhD, FAHA, Clinical Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Georgia State University; Sandra B. Dunbar, RN, DSN, FAAN, Charles Howard Chandler Professor; Patricia C. Clark, RN, PhD, FAHA, Associate Professor; Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Supported by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research, P20 NR007798. Correspondence to Dr. Parker, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: kpark04@emory.edu
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  • Laura P. Kimble,

    1. Kathy P. Parker, RN, PhD, FAAN, Alpha Epsilon, Edith F. Honeycutt Professor and Director, Center for Research on Symptoms, Symptom Interactions, and Health Outcomes; Laura P. Kimble, RN, PhD, FAHA, Clinical Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Georgia State University; Sandra B. Dunbar, RN, DSN, FAAN, Charles Howard Chandler Professor; Patricia C. Clark, RN, PhD, FAHA, Associate Professor; Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Supported by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research, P20 NR007798. Correspondence to Dr. Parker, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: kpark04@emory.edu
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  • Sandra B. Dunbar,

    1. Kathy P. Parker, RN, PhD, FAAN, Alpha Epsilon, Edith F. Honeycutt Professor and Director, Center for Research on Symptoms, Symptom Interactions, and Health Outcomes; Laura P. Kimble, RN, PhD, FAHA, Clinical Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Georgia State University; Sandra B. Dunbar, RN, DSN, FAAN, Charles Howard Chandler Professor; Patricia C. Clark, RN, PhD, FAHA, Associate Professor; Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Supported by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research, P20 NR007798. Correspondence to Dr. Parker, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: kpark04@emory.edu
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  • Patricia C. Clark

    1. Kathy P. Parker, RN, PhD, FAAN, Alpha Epsilon, Edith F. Honeycutt Professor and Director, Center for Research on Symptoms, Symptom Interactions, and Health Outcomes; Laura P. Kimble, RN, PhD, FAHA, Clinical Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Georgia State University; Sandra B. Dunbar, RN, DSN, FAAN, Charles Howard Chandler Professor; Patricia C. Clark, RN, PhD, FAHA, Associate Professor; Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Supported by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research, P20 NR007798. Correspondence to Dr. Parker, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: kpark04@emory.edu
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Abstract

Purpose:To present a summary of the potential shared or interactive mechanisms underlying an exemplar symptom pair: sleep disturbances and pain.

Organizing Construct:Understanding of the multidimensional shared and interactive mechanisms underlying symptoms pairs and clusters has the potential to enhance symptom management.

Methods:Reviews of the literature were conducted to search for information on shared or interactive mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances and pain; minimal data were available. Relevant information about individual symptoms was outlined and categorized in areas often used to describe the multidimensional nature of symptoms, including the physiological, psychological, behavioral, and sociocultural domains. This information was examined for relationships and commonalities.

Conclusions:Many potential shared and interactive mechanisms underlying the symptom pair of sleep disturbances and pain were identified. These results indicate the need for further work and theory development in this area. The symptom interactional framework is a beginning conceptual perspective designed to facilitate this work. Implications for interdisciplinary translational research designed to optimize symptom management are discussed.

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