Integrative Review of Parenting in Nursing Research

Authors

  • Jeffrey D. Gage,

    1. Jeffrey D. Gage, RCpN, MPH, PhD, Alpha Iota, Faculty of Health and Sciences, School of Nursing, Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Christchurch, New Zealand; Kevin D. Everett, PhD, Department of Family and Community Medicine; Linda Bullock, RN, PhD, FAAN, Sinclair School of Nursing; both at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO. Correspondence to Dr. Gage, 32 Puriri Street, Christchurch, New Zealand 8004. E-mail: gagej@cpit.ac.nz
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  • Kevin D. Everett,

    1. Jeffrey D. Gage, RCpN, MPH, PhD, Alpha Iota, Faculty of Health and Sciences, School of Nursing, Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Christchurch, New Zealand; Kevin D. Everett, PhD, Department of Family and Community Medicine; Linda Bullock, RN, PhD, FAAN, Sinclair School of Nursing; both at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO. Correspondence to Dr. Gage, 32 Puriri Street, Christchurch, New Zealand 8004. E-mail: gagej@cpit.ac.nz
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  • Linda Bullock

    1. Jeffrey D. Gage, RCpN, MPH, PhD, Alpha Iota, Faculty of Health and Sciences, School of Nursing, Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Christchurch, New Zealand; Kevin D. Everett, PhD, Department of Family and Community Medicine; Linda Bullock, RN, PhD, FAAN, Sinclair School of Nursing; both at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO. Correspondence to Dr. Gage, 32 Puriri Street, Christchurch, New Zealand 8004. E-mail: gagej@cpit.ac.nz
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Abstract

Purpose: To synthesize and critically analyze parenting research in nursing.

Design: Qualitative, integrative review of nursing research studies about parenting 1993-2004.

Methods: Studies published by nurse researchers in peer-reviewed journals were systematically searched using CINAHL and Medline databases. Data were organized and analyzed with a sample of 17 nursing research studies from core nursing journals.

Findings: The majority of parenting research has been focused on mothers, primarily about parenting children with physical or developmental disabilities. Research about fathers as parents is sparse. Parenting across cultures, parenting in the context of family, and theoretical frameworks for parenting research are not well developed.

Conclusions: The scope of nursing research on parenting is limited. The roles, functions, and contexts of parenting are not well defined. Further research is required to describe parenting and how parenting affects the health of individuals and families.

Ancillary