Concept Analysis of Good Death in the Japanese Community

Authors

  • Keiko Hattori,

    1. Keiko Hattori, RN, MN, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Doctoral candidate; Marilyn A. McCubbin, RN, PhD, FAAN, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Professor; Dianne N. Ishida, PhD, APRN, CMC, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Associate Professor; all at School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI. Correspondence to Ms. Hattori, University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, 2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster Hall, Honolulu, HI 96822. E-mail: hattorik@hawaii.edu
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  • Marilyn A. McCubbin,

    1. Keiko Hattori, RN, MN, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Doctoral candidate; Marilyn A. McCubbin, RN, PhD, FAAN, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Professor; Dianne N. Ishida, PhD, APRN, CMC, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Associate Professor; all at School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI. Correspondence to Ms. Hattori, University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, 2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster Hall, Honolulu, HI 96822. E-mail: hattorik@hawaii.edu
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  • Dianne N. Ishida

    1. Keiko Hattori, RN, MN, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Doctoral candidate; Marilyn A. McCubbin, RN, PhD, FAAN, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Professor; Dianne N. Ishida, PhD, APRN, CMC, Gamma Psi-at-Large, Associate Professor; all at School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI. Correspondence to Ms. Hattori, University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, 2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster Hall, Honolulu, HI 96822. E-mail: hattorik@hawaii.edu
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Abstract

Purpose: To describe the meaning of a good death in the Japanese community.

Organizing Framework: Rogers's (2000) concept analysis strategy.

Methods: A review of the literature was done in March 2004, with a focus on older adults' experiences of good death in the Japanese community; “good death” was the subject heading or key words; and literature was published in English or Japanese.

Findings: Attributes of a good death include sociocultural norms, personal experiences, and continuous process. The person's experience of dying, the social context, the patient's autonomy and control over the dying process, and quality of end-of-life health care are the consequences of the concept. When good death occurs, it leads to family satisfaction, positive bereavement process, and work satisfaction for healthcare professionals.

Conclusions: Integration of findings from the concept analysis and field research results in more accurate understanding of good death. Knowing the individual concept of good death enables nurses to provide culturally competent care to achieve an optimum death experience for both patients and families.

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