Conceptual Model of Symptom-Focused Diabetes Care for African Americans

Authors

  • Anne H. Skelly,

    1. Anne H. Skelly, RN, CS, PhD, FAANP, Gamma Kappa, Professor; Jennifer Leeman, MDiv, DrPH, Research Assistant Professor; John Carlson, MS Statistician; April CMSoward, BA, Project Manager; all at School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Dorothy Burns, RN, PhD, Mu Tau, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Hampton University, Hampton, VA. Funding for this work was through grant No. R01 NR008582 from the National Institute of Nursing Research to the School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Correspondence to Dr. Skelly, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB# 7460 Carrington Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460. E-mail: askelly@email.unc.edu
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  • Jennifer Leeman,

    1. Anne H. Skelly, RN, CS, PhD, FAANP, Gamma Kappa, Professor; Jennifer Leeman, MDiv, DrPH, Research Assistant Professor; John Carlson, MS Statistician; April CMSoward, BA, Project Manager; all at School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Dorothy Burns, RN, PhD, Mu Tau, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Hampton University, Hampton, VA. Funding for this work was through grant No. R01 NR008582 from the National Institute of Nursing Research to the School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Correspondence to Dr. Skelly, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB# 7460 Carrington Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460. E-mail: askelly@email.unc.edu
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  • John Carlson,

    1. Anne H. Skelly, RN, CS, PhD, FAANP, Gamma Kappa, Professor; Jennifer Leeman, MDiv, DrPH, Research Assistant Professor; John Carlson, MS Statistician; April CMSoward, BA, Project Manager; all at School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Dorothy Burns, RN, PhD, Mu Tau, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Hampton University, Hampton, VA. Funding for this work was through grant No. R01 NR008582 from the National Institute of Nursing Research to the School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Correspondence to Dr. Skelly, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB# 7460 Carrington Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460. E-mail: askelly@email.unc.edu
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  • April CM Soward,

    1. Anne H. Skelly, RN, CS, PhD, FAANP, Gamma Kappa, Professor; Jennifer Leeman, MDiv, DrPH, Research Assistant Professor; John Carlson, MS Statistician; April CMSoward, BA, Project Manager; all at School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Dorothy Burns, RN, PhD, Mu Tau, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Hampton University, Hampton, VA. Funding for this work was through grant No. R01 NR008582 from the National Institute of Nursing Research to the School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Correspondence to Dr. Skelly, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB# 7460 Carrington Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460. E-mail: askelly@email.unc.edu
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  • Dorothy Burns

    1. Anne H. Skelly, RN, CS, PhD, FAANP, Gamma Kappa, Professor; Jennifer Leeman, MDiv, DrPH, Research Assistant Professor; John Carlson, MS Statistician; April CMSoward, BA, Project Manager; all at School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Dorothy Burns, RN, PhD, Mu Tau, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Hampton University, Hampton, VA. Funding for this work was through grant No. R01 NR008582 from the National Institute of Nursing Research to the School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Correspondence to Dr. Skelly, School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB# 7460 Carrington Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460. E-mail: askelly@email.unc.edu
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Abstract

Purpose: Development of a conceptual model and description of its use to guide the content and format of a community-based intervention.

Conceptual Model: We developed a symptom-focused model for type 2 diabetes for older African American women based on the UCSF symptom management model. Key concepts in this model are symptom experience, symptom management, and health outcomes.

Methods: Review of literature, intervention protocol.

Conclusions: The symptom-focused conceptual model is an innovative approach to tailoring care to a distinct population and to engaging participants in their own self-care.

Clinical Relevance: Diabetes is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in African Americans; and diabetes self-management is the cornerstone of care. To better meet the distinct needs of diverse populations and positively affect health outcomes, new tailored approaches should be developed that are culturally sensitive and acceptable.

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