Factors Influencing Disclosure of Abuse by Women of Mexican Descent

Authors


Correspondence
Nora Montalvo-Liendo, University of Texas at Brownsville, 80 Fort Brown, Brownsville, TX 78520. E-mail: nora.montalvo@gmail.com

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the factors that influence disclosure of abuse by women of Mexican descent. Few published studies describe the experiences of women of Mexican descent with a history of intimate partner abuse, specifically in terms of their process of disclosure of abuse.

Methods: A qualitative research design was used to conduct this study in south Texas adjacent to the United States-Mexico border. Twenty-six key informants were recruited from two different sites. An open-ended approach with a semistructured interview guide was used to collect the narrative information from the 26 participants.

Results: The findings illuminated that many factors hindered disclosure. Some of these factors included protecting their partners, avoidance of worrying their mothers, and fear of losing their children.

Conclusions: The study may help healthcare providers to understand the complexity of disclosure by women with a history of intimate partner abuse and may help explain why women do not readily disclose their abusive situations.

Clinical Relevance: This study on the disclosure decision process of abuse by women of Mexican descent provides some understanding on the cultural or situational factors that hindered or encouraged disclosure; ultimately this knowledge can help healthcare providers and others to provide for the woman's health, welfare, and safety.

Ancillary