Recovered Medical Error Inventory

Authors

  • Patricia C. Dykes RN, DNSc,

    1. Corporate Manager Nursing Informatics & Research, Partners Health Care System, Information Systems, Boston, MA; 2Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of General Medicine, Boston, MA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Jeffrey M. Rothschild MD, MPH,

    1. Physician, Instructor in Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of General Medicine, Boston, MA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Ann C. Hurley RN, DNSc, FAAN

    1. Senior Nurse Scientist, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Nursing, Boston, MA; School of Nursing, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA
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Correspondence
Dr. Patricia C. Dykes, Partners HealthCare System, 93 Worcester St., Wellesley, MA 02481. E-mail: pdykes@partners.org

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the development and psychometric testing of the Recovered Medical Error Inventory (RMEI).

Design and Methods: Content analysis of structured interviews with expert critical care registered nurses (CCRNs) was used to empirically derive a 25-item RMEI. The RMEI was pilot tested with 345 CCRNs. The data set was randomly divided to use the first half for reliability testing and the second half for validation. A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. Cronbach's alpha values were examined. A t test and Pearson correlation were used to compare scores of the two samples.

Findings: The RMEI consists of 25 items and two subscales. Evidence for initial reliability includes a total scale alpha of .9 and subscale alpha coefficients of .88 (mistake) and .75 (poor judgment).

Conclusions: The RMEI subscales have satisfactory internal consistency reliability and evidence for construct validity. Additional testing is warranted.

Clinical Relevance: A tool to measure CCRNs’ experiences with recovering medical errors allows quantification of nurse surveillance in promoting safe care and preventing unreimbursed hospital costs for treating nosocomial events.

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