• Women's health;
  • survey methodology;
  • breast cancer;
  • health promotion


Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of demographic characteristics, breast cancer knowledge, fatalistic beliefs, health beliefs, and subjective norms on Jordanian women's intention to participate in mammography screening.

Design: A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data at 14 comprehensive healthcare centers in Amman and Zarqa, Jordan. A convenience sample of 142 Jordanian women 40 years of age or older with no history of breast cancer and able to read and write in Arabic participated.

Methods: Self-report surveys included a combination of researcher-designed and existing instruments to measure the study variables. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, t tests, and multiple logistic regression.

Findings: Jordanian women surveyed lacked knowledge about breast cancer. Social norms and self-efficacy highly influenced these women's intention to engage in mammography screening. Younger women were more willing to indicate intention to engage in mammographic screening.

Conclusions: Self-efficacy and the social connectedness of Jordanian society, but not religious beliefs or perceived barriers to screening, influence Jordanian women's intention to undergo mammography. Future research should examine cultural influences, rather than religious beliefs, and investigate Jordanian women's potentially unique perspectives on barriers to actual mammography screening behavior.

Clinical Relevance: The prevalence of mammography screening may be enhanced by focusing interventions on Jordanian women's support systems and empowering women by providing knowledge and skills needed to engage in the procedure.

Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 2012; 44:1, XXX–XXX. ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.