American Anthropologist

For: “Framing Postpartum Hemorrhage as a Consequence of Human Placental Biology: An Evolutionary and Comparative Perspective,” by Julienne Rutherford and Elizabeth Abrams, in American Anthropologist 113(3)

Errata

This article corrects:

  1. Framing Postpartum Hemorrhage as a Consequence of Human Placental Biology: An Evolutionary and Comparative Perspective Volume 113, Issue 3, 417–430, Article first published online: 24 August 2011

The following sentences appeared incorrectly on pages 417–430 in American Anthropologist volume 113, issue 3:

Page 419 line 7–8: The most invasive form is the hemochorial placenta (as seen in rodents and primates), in which the chorion penetrates the endometrial epithelium and the deeper endometrial stroma to arrive in contact with maternal vessels and subsequently even penetrates the vessel walls, so that placental tissue is in direct contact with maternal blood.

Page 419 line 15–17: In the monkeys, implantation is superficial, with moderate penetration of the uterine lining by the chorion (Luckett 1976). Trophoblast cells surround maternal vessels within the endometrium and cause them to lose some of their muscularity, which in turns lowers vascular resistance and increases blood flow to the developing embryo (Kaufmann et al. 2003).

Page 419 line 26–27: In contrast to placentation in monkeys, the hominoid (ape and human, and presumably early hominin) placenta is much more invasive, deeply penetrating the uterine epithelium and migrating through the endometrial stroma beneath into the upper third of the myometrium, the thick muscular wall of the uterus, in a process called interstitial implantation (Enders et al. 1996; Mossman 1987; Pijnenborg et al. 1996).

The correct sentences are:

The most invasive form is the hemochorial placenta (as seen in rodents and haplorrhine primates), in which the chorion penetrates the endometrial epithelium and the deeper endometrial stroma to arrive in contact with maternal vessels and subsequently even penetrates the vessel walls, so that placental tissue is in direct contact with maternal blood.

In the strepsirrhine primates (e.g., lemurs), placentation is epitheliochorial and superficial, with the chorion attaching to the surface of the uterine lining (Luckett 1976). In the monkey, implantation is interstitial, meaning the trophoblast cells of the chorion penetrate the uterine lining and surround maternal vessels within the endometrium, causing them to lose some of their muscularity, which in turns lowers vascular resistance and increases blood flow to the developing embryo (Kaufmann et al. 2003).

In contrast to placentation in monkeys, the hominoid (ape and human, and presumably early hominin) placenta is much more invasive, deeply penetrating the uterine epithelium and migrating through the endometrial stroma beneath into the upper third of the myometrium, the thick muscular wall of the uterus (Enders et al. 1996; Mossman 1987; Pijnenborg et al. 1996).

The authors regret the errors in the published article.

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