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Keywords:

  • [engaged anthropology;
  • protest movements;
  • Occupy Wall Street]

ABSTRACT  In this review essay, I explore today's protest anthropology, the high-stakes domain of professional and political practice in which anthropologists are not just aligned with protest movements, revolts, and uprisings but are also full-fledged participants in them. Focusing on examples from the Occupy Movement, I discuss the promises and perils of taking a protest stance. I argue that, despite the risks, protest anthropology has the power to unsettle many of the current-day knowledge-producing practices in the discipline.