Entextualized Humor in the Formation of Scientist Identities among U.S. Undergraduates

Authors

  • MARY BUCHOLTZ,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of California, Santa Barbara
      Mary Bucholtz is a Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
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  • ELENA SKAPOULLI,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of California, Santa Barbara
      Elena Skapoulli is a Research Associate in the Department of Linguistics and a Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
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  • BRENDAN BARNWELL,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of California, Santa Barbara
      Brendan Barnwell is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
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  • JUNG-EUN JANIE LEE

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Mary Washington
      Jung-Eun Janie Lee is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics in the Department of English, Linguistics, and Communication at the University of Mary Washington.
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Mary Bucholtz is a Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Elena Skapoulli is a Research Associate in the Department of Linguistics and a Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Brendan Barnwell is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Jung-Eun Janie Lee is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics in the Department of English, Linguistics, and Communication at the University of Mary Washington.

Abstract

Studies of the socialization of novices into scientific cultures typically emphasize official knowledge-making activities. However, scientific socialization is also accomplished informally through humor. As entextualized humor, formulaic jokes enable U.S. undergraduate students in science to claim scientist identities both through a displayed orientation to scientific knowledge and through the cultural practice of circulating humorous scientific texts. In response, recipients may align or disalign with these identities and thus position themselves in relation to science cultures. [humor, higher education, identity, science, stance]

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