ERRATUM FOR: MAINTAINING WHITENESS: THE FEAR OF OTHERS AND NICENESS BY SETHA LOW IN TRANSFORMING ANTHROPOLOGY, 17(2)

Errata

This article corrects:

  1. MAINTAINING WHITENESS: THE FEAR OF OTHERS AND NICENESS Volume 17, Issue 2, 79–92, Article first published online: 14 October 2009

In the abstract of the article “Maintaining Whiteness: The Fear of Others and Niceness” by Setha Low in Transforming Anthropology Volume 17, Issue 2 the following errors appeared in the published article:

On page 79
Setha Low's affiliation, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, should not have been included in the article.

On page 79
The keywords gated communities, whiteness, physical environment, niceness, fear of others, crime appeared incorrectly. They should be:
gated community, whiteness, physical environment, niceness, fear of others, crime

On page 79
Setha Low is currently Professor of Environmental Psychology, Geography, Anthropology, and Women's Studies, and Director of the Public Space Research Group at The Graduate Center, City University of New York where she teach courses and trains Ph.D. students in the anthropology of space and place, urban anthropology, culture and environment, and cultural values in historic preservation. She has been awarded a Getty Fellowship, a NEH fellowship, a Fulbright Senior Fellowship, and a Guggenheim for her ethnographic research on public space in Latin America and the United States. Her most recent books are Politics of Public Space (2006, Routledge with Neil Smith), Rethinking Urban Parks: Public Space and Cultural Diversity (2005, University of Texas Press with S. Scheld and D. Taplin). Dr. Low was the President of the American Anthropological Association from 2007 to 2009. Her current research is on the impact of private governance on New York City coop, and she is writing a book titled Spatializing Culture: An Anthropological Theory of Space and Place. Starting in 2009 she will be working on a collaborative project with Dolores Hayden on Spatial Methods and Public Practices funded by Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford.

The bio should read:

Setha Low received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. She started her career as an Assistant and Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning, City and Regional Planning, and Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Low is currently Professor of Environmental Psychology, Geography, Anthropology, and Women's Studies, and Director of the Public Space Research Group at The Graduate Center, City University of New York where she teach courses and trains Ph.D. students in the anthropology of space and place, urban anthropology, culture and environment, and cultural values in historic preservation. She has been awarded a Getty Fellowship, a NEH fellowship, a Fulbright Senior Fellowship and a Guggenheim for her ethnographic research on public space in Latin America and the United States. She is widely published and lectures internationally on these issues. Her most recent books include: Politics of Public Space (2006 Routledge with Neil Smith), Rethinking Urban Parks: Public Space and Cultural Diversity (2005, University of Texas Press with S. Scheld and D. Taplin), Behind the Gates: Life, Security and the Pursuit of Happiness in Fortress America (2004, Routledge), The Anthropology of Space and Place: Locating Culture (2003, Blackwell with D. Lawrence-Zuniga), On the Plaza: The Politics of Public Space and Culture (2000, University of Texas), Theorizing the City: The New Urban Anthropology Reader (1999, Rutgers University Press), Place Attachment (1992, Plenum with I. Altman). Dr. Low was the President of the American Anthropological Association from 2007–2009. Her current research is on the impact of private governance on New York City coop, and she is writing a book entitled Spatialzing Culture: An Anthropological Theory of Space and Place. Starting in 2009 she will be residents working on a collaborative project with Dolores Hayden on Spatial Methods and Public Practices funded by Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford.

On page 85
Despite the low rate of crime in the gated area, residents are overly concerned about people who seem out of place. For example, the anthropologists Constance Perin found that Americans see “renters, blacks, children, the elderly, people with low incomes, together with signs of them in housing and geographical locations, as being culturally unsettling” (1988, cited by Hartigan, 2009).

This sentence should read:

Despite the low rate of crime in the gated areas, residents are overly concerned about people who seem out of place. For example, the anthropologist Constance Perin found that Americans see “renters, blacks, children, the elderly, people with low incomes, together with signs of them in housing and geographical locations, as being culturally unsettling” (1988, cited by Hartigan, 2009).

On page 86
This racialized spatial ordering and the identification of a space with a group of people is a fundamental aspect of how suburban landscapes of reinforce racial prejudice and discrimination.

This sentence should read:

This racialized spatial ordering and the identification of a space with a group of people is a fundamental aspect of how suburban landscapes reinforce racial prejudice and discrimination.

On page 87
Niceness is about keeping things clean, orderly, homogeneous, and controlled so that housing values remain stable, but it is also a way of maintaining whiteness. Whiteness provides access to education, elite taste cultures and behaviors, and allows a group to prosper within the dominant culture. In places like Long Island, New York, and San Antonio, Texas, being “middle class” and being “White” overlap such that one social status can be taken for another.

This phrase should not have been included in the article.

On page 90
Blakely, Edward, and Mary Gail Synder
1997Fortress America. Washington, DC: Brookings Institute.

This reference should not have been included in the reference list.

On page 92
McKenzie, Evan
1998Homeowner Association and California Politics. Urban Affairs Review 34(1): 52–75.

This reference should not have been included in the reference list.

On page 92
Taylor, Ralph B., and Jeanette Covington
1999Community Structural Change and Fear of Crime. Social Problems 40(3):374–395.

This reference should have been:

Taylor, Ralph B., and Jeanette Covington
1993Community Structural Change and Fear of Crime. Social Problems 40(3):374–395.

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